King's College London

Research portal

A career with a heart: exploring occupational regret

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

A career with a heart : exploring occupational regret. / Budjanovcanin, Alexandra; Arinto Martins Rodrigues, Ricardo Filipe; Guest, David.

In: Journal of Managerial Psychology, Vol. 34, No. 3, 02.05.2019, p. 156-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Budjanovcanin, A, Arinto Martins Rodrigues, RF & Guest, D 2019, 'A career with a heart: exploring occupational regret', Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 156-169. https://doi.org/10.1108/JMP-02-2018-0105

APA

Budjanovcanin, A., Arinto Martins Rodrigues, R. F., & Guest, D. (Accepted/In press). A career with a heart: exploring occupational regret. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 34(3), 156-169. https://doi.org/10.1108/JMP-02-2018-0105

Vancouver

Budjanovcanin A, Arinto Martins Rodrigues RF, Guest D. A career with a heart: exploring occupational regret. Journal of Managerial Psychology. 2019 May 2;34(3):156-169. https://doi.org/10.1108/JMP-02-2018-0105

Author

Budjanovcanin, Alexandra ; Arinto Martins Rodrigues, Ricardo Filipe ; Guest, David. / A career with a heart : exploring occupational regret. In: Journal of Managerial Psychology. 2019 ; Vol. 34, No. 3. pp. 156-169.

Bibtex Download

@article{cfe3bed54a7c460dab68e89c3202c547,
title = "A career with a heart: exploring occupational regret",
abstract = "Purpose: This paper explores the concept of career regret. It examines processes that give rise to it including social comparison, social influences on career choice and career satisfaction and explores its association with occupational commitment and intention to quit the profession. Design/Methodology/Approach: Hypotheses were tested among 559 British cardiac physiologists, using an online survey and structural equation modeling. Findings: Research propositions were supported; social influences and social comparison are both associated with career regret. Direct and indirect pathways were found between career regret, occupational commitment and intention to quit the profession.Originality/Value: This paper is one of the first to investigate career choice regret and its associated psychological mechanisms. Research limitations/implications: The paper provides a starting point for future career regret research using a range of methods.Practical implications: Careers advisers both at the point of career choice and within organizations should encourage realistic occupation previews. Managers should become aware of career regret and help to mitigate its effects – for example, facilitating job crafting or reframing of experiences.",
keywords = "Attitudes, Careers, Commitment, Emotions",
author = "Alexandra Budjanovcanin and {Arinto Martins Rodrigues}, {Ricardo Filipe} and David Guest",
year = "2019",
month = may,
day = "2",
doi = "10.1108/JMP-02-2018-0105",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "156--169",
journal = "Journal of Managerial Psychology",
issn = "0268-3946",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - A career with a heart

T2 - exploring occupational regret

AU - Budjanovcanin, Alexandra

AU - Arinto Martins Rodrigues, Ricardo Filipe

AU - Guest, David

PY - 2019/5/2

Y1 - 2019/5/2

N2 - Purpose: This paper explores the concept of career regret. It examines processes that give rise to it including social comparison, social influences on career choice and career satisfaction and explores its association with occupational commitment and intention to quit the profession. Design/Methodology/Approach: Hypotheses were tested among 559 British cardiac physiologists, using an online survey and structural equation modeling. Findings: Research propositions were supported; social influences and social comparison are both associated with career regret. Direct and indirect pathways were found between career regret, occupational commitment and intention to quit the profession.Originality/Value: This paper is one of the first to investigate career choice regret and its associated psychological mechanisms. Research limitations/implications: The paper provides a starting point for future career regret research using a range of methods.Practical implications: Careers advisers both at the point of career choice and within organizations should encourage realistic occupation previews. Managers should become aware of career regret and help to mitigate its effects – for example, facilitating job crafting or reframing of experiences.

AB - Purpose: This paper explores the concept of career regret. It examines processes that give rise to it including social comparison, social influences on career choice and career satisfaction and explores its association with occupational commitment and intention to quit the profession. Design/Methodology/Approach: Hypotheses were tested among 559 British cardiac physiologists, using an online survey and structural equation modeling. Findings: Research propositions were supported; social influences and social comparison are both associated with career regret. Direct and indirect pathways were found between career regret, occupational commitment and intention to quit the profession.Originality/Value: This paper is one of the first to investigate career choice regret and its associated psychological mechanisms. Research limitations/implications: The paper provides a starting point for future career regret research using a range of methods.Practical implications: Careers advisers both at the point of career choice and within organizations should encourage realistic occupation previews. Managers should become aware of career regret and help to mitigate its effects – for example, facilitating job crafting or reframing of experiences.

KW - Attitudes

KW - Careers

KW - Commitment

KW - Emotions

U2 - 10.1108/JMP-02-2018-0105

DO - 10.1108/JMP-02-2018-0105

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 156

EP - 169

JO - Journal of Managerial Psychology

JF - Journal of Managerial Psychology

SN - 0268-3946

IS - 3

ER -

View graph of relations

© 2018 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454