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A dedicated neonatal brain imaging system

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Emer J Hughes, Tobias Winchman, Francesco Padormo, Rui Teixeira, Julia Wurie, Maryanne Sharma, Matthew Fox, Jana Hutter, Lucilio Cordero-Grande, Anthony N Price, Joanna Allsop, Jose Bueno-Conde, Nora Tusor, Tomoki Arichi, A D Edwards, Mary A Rutherford, Serena J Counsell, Joseph V Hajnal

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)794-804
JournalMagnetic resonance in medicine : official journal of the Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume78
Issue number2
Early online date19 Sep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2017

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Abstract

PURPOSE: The goal of the Developing Human Connectome Project is to acquire MRI in 1000 neonates to create a dynamic map of human brain connectivity during early development. High-quality imaging in this cohort without sedation presents a number of technical and practical challenges.

METHODS: We designed a neonatal brain imaging system (NBIS) consisting of a dedicated 32-channel receive array coil and a positioning device that allows placement of the infant's head deep into the coil for maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Disturbance to the infant was minimized by using an MRI-compatible trolley to prepare and transport the infant and by employing a slow ramp-up and continuation of gradient noise during scanning. Scan repeats were minimized by using a restart capability for diffusion MRI and retrospective motion correction. We measured the 1) SNR gain, 2) number of infants with a completed scan protocol, and 3) number of anatomical images with no motion artifact using NBIS compared with using an adult 32-channel head coil.

RESULTS: The NBIS has 2.4 times the SNR of the adult coil and 90% protocol completion rate.

CONCLUSION: The NBIS allows advanced neonatal brain imaging techniques to be employed in neonatal brain imaging with high protocol completion rates.

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