A demonstration of the efficacy of two of the components of cognitive therapy for social phobia

Freda McManus, David M. Clark, Nick Grey, Jennifer Wild, Colette Hirsch, Melanie Fennell, Ann Hackmann, Louise Waddington, Sheena Liness, John Manley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cognitive-behavioral treatments have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of social phobia. However, such treatments comprise a complex set of procedures, and there has been little investigation of the effects of individual procedures. The current study investigates the effects of two single session procedures that form part of cognitive therapy for social phobia [Clark, D., Ehlers, X, McManus, F., Hackmann, A., Fennell, M., Campbell, H., et al. (2003). Cognitive therapy vs fluoxetine in the treatment of social phobia: A randomised placebo controlled trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 71, 1058-1067; Clark, D., Ehlers, A., McManus, F., Fennell, M., Grey, N., Waddington, L, et al. (2006). Cognitive therapy versus exposure and applied relaxation in social phobia: A randomised controlled trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 74, 568-578], namely the "self-focused attention and safety behaviors experiment" and the "video feedback experiment." Results suggest that both procedures are effective in achieving their aims, which are: (i) demonstrating to patients the role of self-focused attention, safety behaviors, and excessively negative self-impressions in maintaining social phobia and (ii) reducing the symptoms of social phobia.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberN/A
Pages (from-to)496 - 503
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2009

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