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A final common pathway to hearing voices: Examining differences and similarities in clinical and non-clinical individuals

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A final common pathway to hearing voices : Examining differences and similarities in clinical and non-clinical individuals. / Daalman, Kirstin; Diederen, Kelly M.

In: Psychosis, Vol. 5, No. 3, 01.10.2013, p. 236-246.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Harvard

Daalman, K & Diederen, KM 2013, 'A final common pathway to hearing voices: Examining differences and similarities in clinical and non-clinical individuals', Psychosis, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 236-246. https://doi.org/10.1080/17522439.2013.796402

APA

Daalman, K., & Diederen, K. M. (2013). A final common pathway to hearing voices: Examining differences and similarities in clinical and non-clinical individuals. Psychosis, 5(3), 236-246. https://doi.org/10.1080/17522439.2013.796402

Vancouver

Daalman K, Diederen KM. A final common pathway to hearing voices: Examining differences and similarities in clinical and non-clinical individuals. Psychosis. 2013 Oct 1;5(3):236-246. https://doi.org/10.1080/17522439.2013.796402

Author

Daalman, Kirstin ; Diederen, Kelly M. / A final common pathway to hearing voices : Examining differences and similarities in clinical and non-clinical individuals. In: Psychosis. 2013 ; Vol. 5, No. 3. pp. 236-246.

Bibtex Download

@article{0b9939b32af5434ba41646e18d690a14,
title = "A final common pathway to hearing voices: Examining differences and similarities in clinical and non-clinical individuals",
abstract = "Although auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) are a cardinal symptom of schizophrenia, they are frequently described on a continuum, ranging from patients diagnosed with a psychotic disorder to non-clinical populations. A key difference between these groups, however, is the absence of additional symptomatology as well as medication use in the group of non-clinical individuals, thus providing an excellent opportunity to study voices in relative isolation. However, this relies on the rather challenging assumption that AVH in clinical and non-clinical individuals can be considered the same phenomenon resulting from a common neurobiological substrate. Studies comparing voices between these groups might provide support for or against this assumption. Furthermore, increasing knowledge about AVH in non-clinical individuals might help eliminate ideas that AVH are always related to a need for care and could hence help to put voices in a more positive light. The aim of this review was therefore to review and summarize studies on AVH in non-clinical individuals with a main focus on the comparison between non-clinical individuals with AVH and individuals diagnosed with a psychotic disorder. Both groups displayed similar brain activation during the experience of AVH, showed aberrant brain connectivity and an increased rate of childhood traumas.",
keywords = "Auditory verbal hallucinations, voices",
author = "Kirstin Daalman and Diederen, {Kelly M.}",
year = "2013",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/17522439.2013.796402",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "236--246",
journal = "Psychosis-Psychological social and integrative approaches",
issn = "1752-2439",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - A final common pathway to hearing voices

T2 - Examining differences and similarities in clinical and non-clinical individuals

AU - Daalman, Kirstin

AU - Diederen, Kelly M.

PY - 2013/10/1

Y1 - 2013/10/1

N2 - Although auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) are a cardinal symptom of schizophrenia, they are frequently described on a continuum, ranging from patients diagnosed with a psychotic disorder to non-clinical populations. A key difference between these groups, however, is the absence of additional symptomatology as well as medication use in the group of non-clinical individuals, thus providing an excellent opportunity to study voices in relative isolation. However, this relies on the rather challenging assumption that AVH in clinical and non-clinical individuals can be considered the same phenomenon resulting from a common neurobiological substrate. Studies comparing voices between these groups might provide support for or against this assumption. Furthermore, increasing knowledge about AVH in non-clinical individuals might help eliminate ideas that AVH are always related to a need for care and could hence help to put voices in a more positive light. The aim of this review was therefore to review and summarize studies on AVH in non-clinical individuals with a main focus on the comparison between non-clinical individuals with AVH and individuals diagnosed with a psychotic disorder. Both groups displayed similar brain activation during the experience of AVH, showed aberrant brain connectivity and an increased rate of childhood traumas.

AB - Although auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) are a cardinal symptom of schizophrenia, they are frequently described on a continuum, ranging from patients diagnosed with a psychotic disorder to non-clinical populations. A key difference between these groups, however, is the absence of additional symptomatology as well as medication use in the group of non-clinical individuals, thus providing an excellent opportunity to study voices in relative isolation. However, this relies on the rather challenging assumption that AVH in clinical and non-clinical individuals can be considered the same phenomenon resulting from a common neurobiological substrate. Studies comparing voices between these groups might provide support for or against this assumption. Furthermore, increasing knowledge about AVH in non-clinical individuals might help eliminate ideas that AVH are always related to a need for care and could hence help to put voices in a more positive light. The aim of this review was therefore to review and summarize studies on AVH in non-clinical individuals with a main focus on the comparison between non-clinical individuals with AVH and individuals diagnosed with a psychotic disorder. Both groups displayed similar brain activation during the experience of AVH, showed aberrant brain connectivity and an increased rate of childhood traumas.

KW - Auditory verbal hallucinations

KW - voices

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84886421152&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/17522439.2013.796402

DO - 10.1080/17522439.2013.796402

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:84886421152

VL - 5

SP - 236

EP - 246

JO - Psychosis-Psychological social and integrative approaches

JF - Psychosis-Psychological social and integrative approaches

SN - 1752-2439

IS - 3

ER -

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