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A generalized and analytical method to solve inverse kinematics of serial and parallel mechanisms using finite screw theory

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingOther chapter contribution

T. Sun ; S. F. Yang ; T. Huang ; J. S. Dai

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationComputational Kinematics - Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop on Computational Kinematics, 2017
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Pages602-608
Number of pages7
Volume50
ISBN (Print)9783319608662
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018
Event7th International Workshop on Computational Kinematics, CK 2017 - Futuroscope-Poitiers, France

Publication series

NameMechanisms and Machine Science
Volume50
ISSN (Print)22110984
ISSN (Electronic)22110992

Conference

Conference7th International Workshop on Computational Kinematics, CK 2017
CountryFrance
CityFuturoscope-Poitiers
Period22/05/201724/05/2017

King's Authors

Abstract

Inverse kinematics is a very important issue in the field of mechanisms and robotics, which is the fundamental problem in kinematical analysis, design and synthesis for both serial mechanisms (SMs) and parallel mechanisms (PMs). The objective of inverse kinematics is to formulate computable kinematic equation at the given pose of end-effector of a SM or moving platform of a PM and then solve all the joint parameters (variables). Solving analytical solution of inverse kinematics is the prerequisite for trajectory planning, precise control and manipulation of mechanisms. This paper presents a generalized method to analytically do inverse kinematics of PMs using finite screw theory. Firstly, the kinematic equation of PM is algebraically formulated through describing finite motions generated by the PM, its limbs and joints employing finite screws. Then, the general procedures to analytically solve the finite screw based kinematic equation are given. Finally, a PM with three translational and one rotational Schoenflies motion is taken as an example to verify the validity of the proposed method.

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