A Model of Rhythm Transcription as Path Selection Through Approximate Common Divisor Graphs

Gonzalo Romero-Garcia*, Corentin Guichaoua, Elaine Chew

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperpeer-review

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Abstract

We apply the concept of approximated common divisors (ACDs) to estimate the tempo and quantize the durations of a rhythmic sequence. The ACD models the duration of the tatum within the sequence, giving its rate in beats per minute. The rhythm input, a series of timestamps, is first split into overlapping frames. Then, we compute the possible ACDs that fit this frame and build a graph with the candidate ACDs as nodes. By building this graph, we transform the quantization problem into one of path selection, where the nodes represent the ACDs and determine the note values of the transcription and the edges represent tempo transitions between frames. A path through the graph thus corresponds to a rhythm transcription. For path selection, we present both an automated method using weights for evaluating the transcription and finding the shortest path, and an interactive approach that gives users the possibility of influencing the path selection.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the International Conference on Technologies for Music Notation and Representation, PRISM Laboratory
Pages115-123
ISBN (Electronic)9791097498030
Publication statusPublished - 5 Sept 2022
EventTENOR 2022 - International Conference on Technologies for Music Notation and Representation - Marseille, France
Duration: 9 May 202211 May 2022
https://tenor2022.prism.cnrs.fr/

Conference

ConferenceTENOR 2022 - International Conference on Technologies for Music Notation and Representation
Country/TerritoryFrance
CityMarseille
Period9/05/202211/05/2022
Internet address

Keywords

  • rhythm transcription
  • music notation
  • music representation

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