A national survey of recovery practice in community mental health teams

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Abstract

Background There is a policy and professional consensus about the importance of ‘recovery’ in mental health services, but the link between recovery-orientation of mental health teams and personal recovery of service users has been under-researched. Aims To investigate differences in team leader, clinician and service user perspectives of recovery orientation of community adult mental health teams in England. Objectives: (1) To compare variations between NHS Trust, team type and participant ratings of recovery-orientation of mental health teams; (2) To explore the relationship between service user ratings of recovery orientation and personal recovery; (3) To test the hypothesis that clinician-rated recovery orientation differs between clinicians with and without personal experience of mental illness or supporting a family member or friend with mental illness. Method In six English Mental Health NHS Trusts (purposively sampled to maximise geographic and demographic spread), randomly-chosen community adult mental health teams were surveyed. A random sample of ten service users, one team leader and a convenience sample of five clinicians were surveyed from each team. All respondents rated the recovery orientation of their team using parallel versions of the Recovery Self Assessment (RSA). In addition, service users also rated their own personal recovery using Questionnaire about Processes of Recovery (QPR). Results Team leaders (n=22) rated recovery orientation higher than clinicians (n=109) or service users (n=120) (Wald(7)=7.0, p=0.03), and both NHS Trust and team type influenced RSA ratings. Service user-rated recovery orientation was a predictor of personal recovery (b=0.52, p <.001; 95%CI: .31 to .74). Team leaders and clinicians with experience of mental illness (39%) or supporting a family member or friend with mental illness (76%) did not differ in their RSA ratings from other team leaders or clinicians. Conclusions Compared with team leaders, frontline clinicians and service users have less positive views on recovery orientation. Increasing recovery orientation may support personal recovery.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 10 Jun 2016

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