A novel skeleton based quantification and 3D volumetric visualization of left atrium fibrosis using Late Gadolinium Enhancement Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Daniele Ravanelli, Elena Dal Piaz, Maurizio Centonze, Giulia Casagranda, Massimiliano Marini, Maurizio Del Greco, Rashed Karim, Kawal Rhode, Aldo Valentini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This work presents the results of a new tool for 3D segmentation, quantification and visualization of cardiac left atrium fibrosis, based on late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI), for stratifying patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) that are candidates for radiofrequency catheter ablation. In this study 10 consecutive patients suffering AF with different grades of atrial fibrosis were considered. LGE-MRI and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images were used to detect and quantify fibrosis of the left atrium using a threshold and 2D skeleton based approach. Quantification and 3D volumetric views of atrial fibrosis were compared with quantification and 3D bipolar voltage maps measured with an electro-anatomical mapping (EAM) system, the clinical reference standard technique for atrial substrate characterization. Segmentation and quantification of fibrosis areas proved to be clinically reliable among all different fibrosis stages. The proposed tool obtains discrepancies in fibrosis quantification less than 4% from EAM results and yields accurate 3D volumetric views of fibrosis of left atrium. The novel 3D visualization and quantification tool based on LGE-MRI allows detection of cardiac left atrium fibrosis areas. This non invasive method provides a clinical alternative to EAM systems for quantification and localization of atrial fibrosis.
Original languageEnglish
JournalIeee Transactions on Medical Imaging
VolumePP
Issue number99
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Nov 2013

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