A Population-Based Investigation into the Self-Reported Reasons for Sleep Problems

David Armstrong, Alex Dregan*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Typologies of sleep problems have usually relied on identifying underlying causes or symptom clusters. In this study the value of using the patient's own reasons for sleep disturbance are explored. Using secondary data analysis of a nationally representative psychiatric survey the patterning of the various reasons respondents provided for self-reported sleep problems were examined. Over two thirds (69.3%) of respondents could identify a specific reason for their sleep problem with worry (37.9%) and illness (20.1%) representing the most commonly reported reasons. And while women reported more sleep problems for almost every reason compared with men, the patterning of reasons by age showed marked variability. Sleep problem symptoms such as difficulty getting to sleep or waking early also showed variability by different reasons as did the association with major correlates such as worry, depression, anxiety and poor health. While prevalence surveys of 'insomnia' or 'poor sleep' often assume the identification of an underlying homogeneous construct there may be grounds for recognising the existence of different sleep problem types particularly in the context of the patient's perceived reason for the problem.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere101368
Number of pages6
JournalPL o S One
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2014

Keywords

  • INSOMNIA
  • DISTURBANCES
  • EPIDEMIOLOGY
  • PREVALENCE
  • PREDICTORS
  • COHORT

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