A prospective clinical study of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and IRM when used as root-end filling materials in endodontic surgery

B S Chong, T R Pitt Ford, M B Hudson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

212 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AIM: To assess the success rate of the root-end filling material, Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA). METHODOLOGY: Referred adult patients were recruited using strict entry criteria and randomly allocated to receive MTA or IRM. A standardized surgical technique was employed: the root end was resected perpendicularly and a root-end cavity was prepared ultrasonically and filled. A radiograph taken immediately after surgery was compared with those taken at 12 and 24 months. Customised film holders and the paralleling technique were used; radiographs were assessed by two trained observers using agreed criteria. The results from 122 patients (58 in IRM group, 64 in MTA group) after 12 months and 108 patients (47 in IRM group, 61 in MTA group) for the 24-month review period were analysed using the chi2 test. RESULTS: The highest number of teeth with complete healing at both times was observed when MTA was used. When the numbers of teeth with complete and incomplete (scar) healing, and those with uncertain and unsatisfactory healing were combined, the success rate for MTA was higher (84% after 12 months, 92% after 24 months) compared with IRM (76% after 12 months, 87% after 24 months). However, statistical analysis showed no significant difference in success between materials (P > 0.05) at both 12 and 24 months. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the use of MTA as a root-end filling material resulted in a high success rate that was not significantly better than that obtained using IRM.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)520 - 526
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Endodontic Journal
Volume36
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2003

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