A prospective study on the effect of coronal tooth structure loss on the 4-year clinical survival of root canal retreated teeth and retrospective validation of the Dental Practicality Index

N. Al-Nuaimi*, S. Ciapryna, M. Chia, S. Patel, F. Mannocci

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: First, to examine the impact of the residual volume of coronal tooth structure in posterior teeth measured with an intra-oral scanner on the 4-year clinical survival of root canal retreated teeth. Secondly, to assess retrospectively the effectiveness of the Dental Practicality Index (DPI) in predicting the survival of root canal retreated teeth. Methodology: A total of 156 posterior root canal treated teeth (140 patients) had baseline periapical radiographs (PA) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans taken prior to root canal retreatment. These teeth were followed up with a clinical examination at 1, 2, 3 and 4 years (T12, T24, T36 and T48) with periapical radiographs and CBCT images taken at T12, and PA taken at T24, T36 and T48 where appropriate. Root canal retreated teeth were dichotomized into ‘survived’ versus ‘extracted’. Fisher’s exact test was used to determine the association between the volume of remaining coronal tooth structure and the 4-year tooth survival. The Dental Practicality Index for each tooth was established using the preoperative clinical and radiographical data. Fisher’s exact test was used to establish a relationship between categorical variables, the total score of DPI vs tooth outcome. Results: The percentage of extractions associated with teeth with <29.5% remaining coronal tooth structure was 3 times higher (12.5%) compared to that of teeth with a residual tooth structure > 29.5% (3.5%), but with no significant difference (P = 0.073). There was a significant correlation between the outcome of root canal retreatments at 1 year, assessed by both PA and CBCT, and the 4-year survival (Fisher’s exact test, P = 0.007 and P = 0.001, respectively). Teeth with DPI scores ≥ 6 were more likely to be extracted than teeth with DPI score < 6 (18.8% vs. 3.9%) (Fisher’s exact test, P = 0.045). Conclusion: Teeth with <30% of remaining tooth structure were associated with a survival rate above 80% and teeth with more than 30% of residual tooth structure survived in more than 94% of the cases. The radiographic outcome of root canal treatment can also help to predict tooth survival with teeth having an unfavourable outcome at 1 year more likely to be extracted within 4 years of completion of treatment. The DPI score can potentially be used to identify teeth with failed root canal treatment, which are likely to be extracted following retreatment and cuspal coverage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1040-1049
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Endodontic Journal
Volume53
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • coronal tooth structure
  • Dental Practicality Index
  • root canal retreatment
  • tooth survival
  • treatment outcome

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