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A Qualitative Content Analysis of User Perspectives of Mood-Monitoring Apps Available to Young People.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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A Qualitative Content Analysis of User Perspectives of Mood-Monitoring Apps Available to Young People. / Widnall, Emily; Grant, Claire; Wang, Tao; Cross, Lauren; Velupillai, Sumithra; Roberts, Angus; Stewart, Robert; Simonoff, Emily; Downs, Johnny.

In: JMIR mHealth and uHealth, 11.08.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Widnall, E, Grant, C, Wang, T, Cross, L, Velupillai, S, Roberts, A, Stewart, R, Simonoff, E & Downs, J 2020, 'A Qualitative Content Analysis of User Perspectives of Mood-Monitoring Apps Available to Young People.', JMIR mHealth and uHealth.

APA

Widnall, E., Grant, C., Wang, T., Cross, L., Velupillai, S., Roberts, A., Stewart, R., Simonoff, E., & Downs, J. (Accepted/In press). A Qualitative Content Analysis of User Perspectives of Mood-Monitoring Apps Available to Young People. JMIR mHealth and uHealth.

Vancouver

Widnall E, Grant C, Wang T, Cross L, Velupillai S, Roberts A et al. A Qualitative Content Analysis of User Perspectives of Mood-Monitoring Apps Available to Young People. JMIR mHealth and uHealth. 2020 Aug 11.

Author

Widnall, Emily ; Grant, Claire ; Wang, Tao ; Cross, Lauren ; Velupillai, Sumithra ; Roberts, Angus ; Stewart, Robert ; Simonoff, Emily ; Downs, Johnny. / A Qualitative Content Analysis of User Perspectives of Mood-Monitoring Apps Available to Young People. In: JMIR mHealth and uHealth. 2020.

Bibtex Download

@article{a11498e850684f44a8efd39f510f65b5,
title = "A Qualitative Content Analysis of User Perspectives of Mood-Monitoring Apps Available to Young People.",
abstract = "BackgroundMobile health (mHealth) apps are increasingly available and used in a clinical context to monitor young people{\textquoteright}s mood and mental health. Despite the benefits of accessibility and cost-effectiveness, consumer engagement remains a hurdle for uptake and continued use. Hundreds of mood-monitoring apps are publicly available to young people on app stores; however, few studies have examined consumer perspectives. App store reviews held on Google and Apple platforms provide a large, rich source of naturally generated, publicly available user reviews. Although commercial developers use this data to modify and improve their apps, to date there has been very little in-depth evaluation of app store user reviews within scientific research, and our current understanding of what makes apps engaging and valuable to young people is limited.ObjectiveThe aim of our study was to gain a better understanding of what app users consider useful to encourage frequent and prolonged use of mood monitoring apps appropriate for young people. MethodsA systematic approach was applied to the selection of apps and reviews. We identified mood-monitoring apps (n=53) by a combination of automated API methods. We only included apps appropriate for young people based on app store age categories (apps available to those under the age of 18). We subsequently downloaded all available user reviews via API data scraping methods and selected a representative sub-sample of reviews (n=1,803) for a manual qualitative content analysis.ResultsThe qualitative content analysis revealed 8 main themes: 1) accessibility (34%); 2) flexibility (21%); 3) recording/representation of mood (18%); 4) user requests (17%); 5) reflecting on mood (16%); 6) technical features (16%); 7) design (13%) and 8) health promotion (11%). 6 minor themes were also identified: 1) notification/reminders; 2) recommendation; 3) privacy, security and transparency 4) developer; 5) adverts and 6) social/community. ConclusionUsers value mood monitoring apps that can be personalised to their needs, have a simple and intuitive design and allow accurate representation and review of complex and fluctuating moods. App store reviews are a valuable repository of user engagement feedback and provide a wealth of information about what users{\textquoteright} value in an app and what user needs are not being met. Users perceive mood-monitoring apps positively but over 20% of reviews identified the need for improvement. ",
keywords = "Mood-monitoring;, engagement;, mobile applications, mHealth, smartphone, qualitative research",
author = "Emily Widnall and Claire Grant and Tao Wang and Lauren Cross and Sumithra Velupillai and Angus Roberts and Robert Stewart and Emily Simonoff and Johnny Downs",
year = "2020",
month = aug,
day = "11",
language = "English",
journal = "JMIR mHealth and uHealth",
issn = "2291-5222",
publisher = "Journal of medical Internet Research",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Qualitative Content Analysis of User Perspectives of Mood-Monitoring Apps Available to Young People.

AU - Widnall, Emily

AU - Grant, Claire

AU - Wang, Tao

AU - Cross, Lauren

AU - Velupillai, Sumithra

AU - Roberts, Angus

AU - Stewart, Robert

AU - Simonoff, Emily

AU - Downs, Johnny

PY - 2020/8/11

Y1 - 2020/8/11

N2 - BackgroundMobile health (mHealth) apps are increasingly available and used in a clinical context to monitor young people’s mood and mental health. Despite the benefits of accessibility and cost-effectiveness, consumer engagement remains a hurdle for uptake and continued use. Hundreds of mood-monitoring apps are publicly available to young people on app stores; however, few studies have examined consumer perspectives. App store reviews held on Google and Apple platforms provide a large, rich source of naturally generated, publicly available user reviews. Although commercial developers use this data to modify and improve their apps, to date there has been very little in-depth evaluation of app store user reviews within scientific research, and our current understanding of what makes apps engaging and valuable to young people is limited.ObjectiveThe aim of our study was to gain a better understanding of what app users consider useful to encourage frequent and prolonged use of mood monitoring apps appropriate for young people. MethodsA systematic approach was applied to the selection of apps and reviews. We identified mood-monitoring apps (n=53) by a combination of automated API methods. We only included apps appropriate for young people based on app store age categories (apps available to those under the age of 18). We subsequently downloaded all available user reviews via API data scraping methods and selected a representative sub-sample of reviews (n=1,803) for a manual qualitative content analysis.ResultsThe qualitative content analysis revealed 8 main themes: 1) accessibility (34%); 2) flexibility (21%); 3) recording/representation of mood (18%); 4) user requests (17%); 5) reflecting on mood (16%); 6) technical features (16%); 7) design (13%) and 8) health promotion (11%). 6 minor themes were also identified: 1) notification/reminders; 2) recommendation; 3) privacy, security and transparency 4) developer; 5) adverts and 6) social/community. ConclusionUsers value mood monitoring apps that can be personalised to their needs, have a simple and intuitive design and allow accurate representation and review of complex and fluctuating moods. App store reviews are a valuable repository of user engagement feedback and provide a wealth of information about what users’ value in an app and what user needs are not being met. Users perceive mood-monitoring apps positively but over 20% of reviews identified the need for improvement.

AB - BackgroundMobile health (mHealth) apps are increasingly available and used in a clinical context to monitor young people’s mood and mental health. Despite the benefits of accessibility and cost-effectiveness, consumer engagement remains a hurdle for uptake and continued use. Hundreds of mood-monitoring apps are publicly available to young people on app stores; however, few studies have examined consumer perspectives. App store reviews held on Google and Apple platforms provide a large, rich source of naturally generated, publicly available user reviews. Although commercial developers use this data to modify and improve their apps, to date there has been very little in-depth evaluation of app store user reviews within scientific research, and our current understanding of what makes apps engaging and valuable to young people is limited.ObjectiveThe aim of our study was to gain a better understanding of what app users consider useful to encourage frequent and prolonged use of mood monitoring apps appropriate for young people. MethodsA systematic approach was applied to the selection of apps and reviews. We identified mood-monitoring apps (n=53) by a combination of automated API methods. We only included apps appropriate for young people based on app store age categories (apps available to those under the age of 18). We subsequently downloaded all available user reviews via API data scraping methods and selected a representative sub-sample of reviews (n=1,803) for a manual qualitative content analysis.ResultsThe qualitative content analysis revealed 8 main themes: 1) accessibility (34%); 2) flexibility (21%); 3) recording/representation of mood (18%); 4) user requests (17%); 5) reflecting on mood (16%); 6) technical features (16%); 7) design (13%) and 8) health promotion (11%). 6 minor themes were also identified: 1) notification/reminders; 2) recommendation; 3) privacy, security and transparency 4) developer; 5) adverts and 6) social/community. ConclusionUsers value mood monitoring apps that can be personalised to their needs, have a simple and intuitive design and allow accurate representation and review of complex and fluctuating moods. App store reviews are a valuable repository of user engagement feedback and provide a wealth of information about what users’ value in an app and what user needs are not being met. Users perceive mood-monitoring apps positively but over 20% of reviews identified the need for improvement.

KW - Mood-monitoring;

KW - engagement;

KW - mobile applications

KW - mHealth

KW - smartphone

KW - qualitative research

M3 - Article

JO - JMIR mHealth and uHealth

JF - JMIR mHealth and uHealth

SN - 2291-5222

ER -

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