A systematic review of factors affecting intended and actual adherence with antiviral medication as treatment or prophylaxis in seasonal and pandemic flu

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Abstract

Aim: The aim of this study was to identify factors predicting actual or intended adherence to antivirals as treatment or prophylaxis for influenza.
Method: Literature from inception to March 2015 was systematically reviewed to find studies reporting predictors of adherence to antivirals and self-reported reasons for non-adherence to antivirals.

Results: Twenty-six studies were included in the review; twenty identified through the literature search and six through other means. Of these studies, eighteen assessed predictors of actual adherence to antivirals whereas eight assessed predictors of intended adherence. The most commonly found predictor of and self-reported reason for non-adherence was the occurrence of side-effects. Other predictors include perceptions surrounding self-efficacy, response-efficacy and perceived personal consequences as well as social influences of others’ experiences of taking antivirals.

Conclusion: Predictors identified in this review can be used to help inform communications in order to increase adherence to antivirals in both seasonal and pandemic influenza.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)462–478
JournalInfluenza And Other Respiratory Viruses
Volume10
Issue number6
Early online date11 Jul 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2016

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Antiviral
  • Influenza
  • Pandemic

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