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A tale of two hearth sites: Neolithic and intermittent mid to late Holocene occupations in the Jubbah oasis, northern Saudi Arabia

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A tale of two hearth sites : Neolithic and intermittent mid to late Holocene occupations in the Jubbah oasis, northern Saudi Arabia. / Guagnin, Maria; Shipton, Ceri; Martin, Louise et al.

In: Archaeological Research in Asia, Vol. 26, 100278, 06.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Guagnin, M, Shipton, C, Martin, L, Kingwell-Banham, E, Breeze, P, Graham, L, Ott, F, Stewart, M, El-Dossary, S, Zahrani, B, Al-Omari, A, Alsharekh, AM & Petraglia, M 2021, 'A tale of two hearth sites: Neolithic and intermittent mid to late Holocene occupations in the Jubbah oasis, northern Saudi Arabia', Archaeological Research in Asia, vol. 26, 100278. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ara.2021.100278

APA

Guagnin, M., Shipton, C., Martin, L., Kingwell-Banham, E., Breeze, P., Graham, L., Ott, F., Stewart, M., El-Dossary, S., Zahrani, B., Al-Omari, A., Alsharekh, A. M., & Petraglia, M. (2021). A tale of two hearth sites: Neolithic and intermittent mid to late Holocene occupations in the Jubbah oasis, northern Saudi Arabia. Archaeological Research in Asia, 26, [100278]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ara.2021.100278

Vancouver

Guagnin M, Shipton C, Martin L, Kingwell-Banham E, Breeze P, Graham L et al. A tale of two hearth sites: Neolithic and intermittent mid to late Holocene occupations in the Jubbah oasis, northern Saudi Arabia. Archaeological Research in Asia. 2021 Jun;26. 100278. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ara.2021.100278

Author

Guagnin, Maria ; Shipton, Ceri ; Martin, Louise et al. / A tale of two hearth sites : Neolithic and intermittent mid to late Holocene occupations in the Jubbah oasis, northern Saudi Arabia. In: Archaeological Research in Asia. 2021 ; Vol. 26.

Bibtex Download

@article{0d8aa85c388642ffabd8632a60129deb,
title = "A tale of two hearth sites: Neolithic and intermittent mid to late Holocene occupations in the Jubbah oasis, northern Saudi Arabia",
abstract = "Hearth sites are characteristic of Holocene occupation in the Arabian sand seas but remain mostly unstudied. Excavations of two multi-period hearth sites in the Jebel Oraf palaeolake basin, in the oasis of Jubbah, now substantially increase our knowledge of these sites. In total, 17 of 170 identified hearths were excavated at Jebel Oraf 2 (ORF2), an open-air site on the edge of a palaeolake. In addition, 11 hearths were excavated at the stratified site of Jebel Oraf 115 (ORF115), a rockshelter formed by two boulders. Radiocarbon dating and lithic assemblages indicate that the majority of these hearths were in use in the second half of the 6th millennium BCE, and that both sites were used sporadically until the recent past. All hearths appear to have been extremely short-lived, and faunal remains suggest they may have been used to cook meat from hunted or trapped wildlife, and occasionally from livestock. The frequent use of grinding stones, often broken into fragments and used to cover hearths is also attested. Evidence for the exceptionally early use of metal from dated occupation deposits as well as from rock art, shows that these short-lived sites were well connected to technological innovations in the wider region.",
keywords = "Climate, Holocene, Neolithic, Pastoralism, Saudi Arabia, Settlement",
author = "Maria Guagnin and Ceri Shipton and Louise Martin and Eleanor Kingwell-Banham and Paul Breeze and Lisa Graham and Florian Ott and Mathew Stewart and Sarah El-Dossary and Badr Zahrani and Abdulaziz Al-Omari and Alsharekh, {Abdullah M.} and Michael Petraglia",
note = "Funding Information: We thank His Royal Highness Prince Sultan bin Salman, former President of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH), and Prof. Ali Ghabban, former Vice President, for permission to carry out this research. We also thank Mr. Jamal Omar, former Vice President of Antiquities and Museums, and Dr. Abdullah Al-Zahrani for their support and assistance during fieldwork in Jubbah. Financial support was provided by the SCTH, the European Research Council (grant number 295719, to MDP), the Max Planck Society, the Dahlem Research School (to MG), the Leverhulme Trust (ECF-2019-538, to PSB) and the Research Center at the College of Tourism & Archaeology, King Saud University (to AMA). Funding Information: We thank His Royal Highness Prince Sultan bin Salman, former President of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH), and Prof. Ali Ghabban, former Vice President, for permission to carry out this research. We also thank Mr. Jamal Omar, former Vice President of Antiquities and Museums, and Dr. Abdullah Al-Zahrani for their support and assistance during fieldwork in Jubbah. Financial support was provided by the SCTH, the European Research Council (grant number 295719 , to MDP), the Max Planck Society, the Dahlem Research School (to MG), the Leverhulme Trust ( ECF-2019-538 , to PSB) and the Research Center at the College of Tourism & Archaeology, King Saud University (to AMA). Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 Elsevier Ltd Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = jun,
doi = "10.1016/j.ara.2021.100278",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
journal = "Archaeological Research in Asia",
issn = "2352-2267",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - A tale of two hearth sites

T2 - Neolithic and intermittent mid to late Holocene occupations in the Jubbah oasis, northern Saudi Arabia

AU - Guagnin, Maria

AU - Shipton, Ceri

AU - Martin, Louise

AU - Kingwell-Banham, Eleanor

AU - Breeze, Paul

AU - Graham, Lisa

AU - Ott, Florian

AU - Stewart, Mathew

AU - El-Dossary, Sarah

AU - Zahrani, Badr

AU - Al-Omari, Abdulaziz

AU - Alsharekh, Abdullah M.

AU - Petraglia, Michael

N1 - Funding Information: We thank His Royal Highness Prince Sultan bin Salman, former President of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH), and Prof. Ali Ghabban, former Vice President, for permission to carry out this research. We also thank Mr. Jamal Omar, former Vice President of Antiquities and Museums, and Dr. Abdullah Al-Zahrani for their support and assistance during fieldwork in Jubbah. Financial support was provided by the SCTH, the European Research Council (grant number 295719, to MDP), the Max Planck Society, the Dahlem Research School (to MG), the Leverhulme Trust (ECF-2019-538, to PSB) and the Research Center at the College of Tourism & Archaeology, King Saud University (to AMA). Funding Information: We thank His Royal Highness Prince Sultan bin Salman, former President of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH), and Prof. Ali Ghabban, former Vice President, for permission to carry out this research. We also thank Mr. Jamal Omar, former Vice President of Antiquities and Museums, and Dr. Abdullah Al-Zahrani for their support and assistance during fieldwork in Jubbah. Financial support was provided by the SCTH, the European Research Council (grant number 295719 , to MDP), the Max Planck Society, the Dahlem Research School (to MG), the Leverhulme Trust ( ECF-2019-538 , to PSB) and the Research Center at the College of Tourism & Archaeology, King Saud University (to AMA). Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Elsevier Ltd Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/6

Y1 - 2021/6

N2 - Hearth sites are characteristic of Holocene occupation in the Arabian sand seas but remain mostly unstudied. Excavations of two multi-period hearth sites in the Jebel Oraf palaeolake basin, in the oasis of Jubbah, now substantially increase our knowledge of these sites. In total, 17 of 170 identified hearths were excavated at Jebel Oraf 2 (ORF2), an open-air site on the edge of a palaeolake. In addition, 11 hearths were excavated at the stratified site of Jebel Oraf 115 (ORF115), a rockshelter formed by two boulders. Radiocarbon dating and lithic assemblages indicate that the majority of these hearths were in use in the second half of the 6th millennium BCE, and that both sites were used sporadically until the recent past. All hearths appear to have been extremely short-lived, and faunal remains suggest they may have been used to cook meat from hunted or trapped wildlife, and occasionally from livestock. The frequent use of grinding stones, often broken into fragments and used to cover hearths is also attested. Evidence for the exceptionally early use of metal from dated occupation deposits as well as from rock art, shows that these short-lived sites were well connected to technological innovations in the wider region.

AB - Hearth sites are characteristic of Holocene occupation in the Arabian sand seas but remain mostly unstudied. Excavations of two multi-period hearth sites in the Jebel Oraf palaeolake basin, in the oasis of Jubbah, now substantially increase our knowledge of these sites. In total, 17 of 170 identified hearths were excavated at Jebel Oraf 2 (ORF2), an open-air site on the edge of a palaeolake. In addition, 11 hearths were excavated at the stratified site of Jebel Oraf 115 (ORF115), a rockshelter formed by two boulders. Radiocarbon dating and lithic assemblages indicate that the majority of these hearths were in use in the second half of the 6th millennium BCE, and that both sites were used sporadically until the recent past. All hearths appear to have been extremely short-lived, and faunal remains suggest they may have been used to cook meat from hunted or trapped wildlife, and occasionally from livestock. The frequent use of grinding stones, often broken into fragments and used to cover hearths is also attested. Evidence for the exceptionally early use of metal from dated occupation deposits as well as from rock art, shows that these short-lived sites were well connected to technological innovations in the wider region.

KW - Climate

KW - Holocene

KW - Neolithic

KW - Pastoralism

KW - Saudi Arabia

KW - Settlement

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85103375543&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ara.2021.100278

DO - 10.1016/j.ara.2021.100278

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85103375543

VL - 26

JO - Archaeological Research in Asia

JF - Archaeological Research in Asia

SN - 2352-2267

M1 - 100278

ER -

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