Academics ‘staying on’ post retirement age in English Universities Departments of Education: Opportunities, threats and employment policies

Rosalyn George, Meg Maguire

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)
81 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In the UK, a default retirement age no longer exists and more people choose to ‘stay on’ in their academic posts. ‘Staying on’ poses opportunities and threats in the academic labour market. Older academics can make a positive contribution to their institution through their expertise and experience. By continuing to work, paying tax and keeping healthy, they may directly and indirectly reduce social health and welfare costs. Alternatively, in a context where academic jobs may be decreasing, older workers may be positioned as limiting the employment and promotion opportunities for younger colleagues by staying on. Drawing on twelve in-depth semi-structured interviews with academics who have stayed working in university education departments, this paper explores these issues alongside policy-related questions about employment in the sector.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Educational Studies
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Post-retirement work
  • ageism
  • employment policy
  • older academics

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