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Actions speak louder than words: how employees mind the implementation gap

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Actions speak louder than words : how employees mind the implementation gap. / Budjanovcanin, Alexandra.

In: International Journal of Human Resource Management, 23.02.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Budjanovcanin, A 2018, 'Actions speak louder than words: how employees mind the implementation gap', International Journal of Human Resource Management. https://doi.org/10.1080/09585192.2018.1443959

APA

Budjanovcanin, A. (2018). Actions speak louder than words: how employees mind the implementation gap. International Journal of Human Resource Management. https://doi.org/10.1080/09585192.2018.1443959

Vancouver

Budjanovcanin A. Actions speak louder than words: how employees mind the implementation gap. International Journal of Human Resource Management. 2018 Feb 23. https://doi.org/10.1080/09585192.2018.1443959

Author

Budjanovcanin, Alexandra. / Actions speak louder than words : how employees mind the implementation gap. In: International Journal of Human Resource Management. 2018.

Bibtex Download

@article{b5ca9a78572041f0ab1cd497781c06d4,
title = "Actions speak louder than words: how employees mind the implementation gap",
abstract = "Integral to employees{\textquoteright} working lives are the HR policies and more importantly, the practices that follow those and their implementation, which employees experience directly. To date, research on HR implementation considers how HRM is {\textquoteleft}done to{\textquoteright} employees by management and therefore ignores the agency of individuals to shape how HRM is {\textquoteleft}done to them{\textquoteright}. Taking the perspective of employees, in a qualitative study of female lawyers, this paper examines employees{\textquoteright} roles in shaping HR implementation, addressing a lack of understanding about the role of {\textquoteleft}others{\textquoteright} in the process. Drawing on the concept of social power, the article focuses on the implementation of agile working practices within UK-based law firms. It finds that despite lacking legitimate position power to influence processes, employees draw on a variety of other power sources (e.g. referent, information, coercive) and tactics (e.g. leveraging membership of professional networks) in order to influence their working environment with respect to HR policy and practice, particularly in response to perceived implementation gaps. The current study underlines that employees may be integral to bridging the gap between policy and practice and therefore to ensuring the link between HRM and organisational performance. It also proposes that behavioural responses to HR practices should be considered in future theorising of the HRM-performance relationship.",
keywords = "HRM, Implementation, Practices, Agency, Flexibility, Power",
author = "Alexandra Budjanovcanin",
year = "2018",
month = feb,
day = "23",
doi = "10.1080/09585192.2018.1443959",
language = "English",
journal = "International Journal of Human Resource Management",
issn = "0958-5192",
publisher = "ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Actions speak louder than words

T2 - how employees mind the implementation gap

AU - Budjanovcanin, Alexandra

PY - 2018/2/23

Y1 - 2018/2/23

N2 - Integral to employees’ working lives are the HR policies and more importantly, the practices that follow those and their implementation, which employees experience directly. To date, research on HR implementation considers how HRM is ‘done to’ employees by management and therefore ignores the agency of individuals to shape how HRM is ‘done to them’. Taking the perspective of employees, in a qualitative study of female lawyers, this paper examines employees’ roles in shaping HR implementation, addressing a lack of understanding about the role of ‘others’ in the process. Drawing on the concept of social power, the article focuses on the implementation of agile working practices within UK-based law firms. It finds that despite lacking legitimate position power to influence processes, employees draw on a variety of other power sources (e.g. referent, information, coercive) and tactics (e.g. leveraging membership of professional networks) in order to influence their working environment with respect to HR policy and practice, particularly in response to perceived implementation gaps. The current study underlines that employees may be integral to bridging the gap between policy and practice and therefore to ensuring the link between HRM and organisational performance. It also proposes that behavioural responses to HR practices should be considered in future theorising of the HRM-performance relationship.

AB - Integral to employees’ working lives are the HR policies and more importantly, the practices that follow those and their implementation, which employees experience directly. To date, research on HR implementation considers how HRM is ‘done to’ employees by management and therefore ignores the agency of individuals to shape how HRM is ‘done to them’. Taking the perspective of employees, in a qualitative study of female lawyers, this paper examines employees’ roles in shaping HR implementation, addressing a lack of understanding about the role of ‘others’ in the process. Drawing on the concept of social power, the article focuses on the implementation of agile working practices within UK-based law firms. It finds that despite lacking legitimate position power to influence processes, employees draw on a variety of other power sources (e.g. referent, information, coercive) and tactics (e.g. leveraging membership of professional networks) in order to influence their working environment with respect to HR policy and practice, particularly in response to perceived implementation gaps. The current study underlines that employees may be integral to bridging the gap between policy and practice and therefore to ensuring the link between HRM and organisational performance. It also proposes that behavioural responses to HR practices should be considered in future theorising of the HRM-performance relationship.

KW - HRM

KW - Implementation

KW - Practices

KW - Agency

KW - Flexibility

KW - Power

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85042400903&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/09585192.2018.1443959

DO - 10.1080/09585192.2018.1443959

M3 - Article

JO - International Journal of Human Resource Management

JF - International Journal of Human Resource Management

SN - 0958-5192

ER -

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