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Addressing context dependence in ecology

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Addressing context dependence in ecology. / Catford, Jane A.; Wilson, John R.U.; Pyšek, Petr; Hulme, Philip E.; Duncan, Richard P.

In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Vol. 37, No. 2, 02.2022, p. 158-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Catford, JA, Wilson, JRU, Pyšek, P, Hulme, PE & Duncan, RP 2022, 'Addressing context dependence in ecology', Trends in Ecology & Evolution, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 158-170. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2021.09.007

APA

Catford, J. A., Wilson, J. R. U., Pyšek, P., Hulme, P. E., & Duncan, R. P. (2022). Addressing context dependence in ecology. Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 37(2), 158-170. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2021.09.007

Vancouver

Catford JA, Wilson JRU, Pyšek P, Hulme PE, Duncan RP. Addressing context dependence in ecology. Trends in Ecology & Evolution. 2022 Feb;37(2):158-170. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2021.09.007

Author

Catford, Jane A. ; Wilson, John R.U. ; Pyšek, Petr ; Hulme, Philip E. ; Duncan, Richard P. / Addressing context dependence in ecology. In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution. 2022 ; Vol. 37, No. 2. pp. 158-170.

Bibtex Download

@article{a46e4827e45f4c50a5abe1a18dfbda75,
title = "Addressing context dependence in ecology",
abstract = "Context dependence is widely invoked to explain disparate results in ecology. It arises when the magnitude or sign of a relationship varies due to the conditions under which it is observed. Such variation, especially when unexplained, can lead to spurious or seemingly contradictory conclusions, which can limit understanding and our ability to transfer findings across studies, space, and time. Using examples from biological invasions, we identify two types of context dependence resulting from four sources: mechanistic context dependence arises from interaction effects; and apparent context dependence can arise from the presence of confounding factors, problems of statistical inference, and methodological differences among studies. Addressing context dependence is a critical challenge in ecology, essential for increased understanding and prediction.",
keywords = "apparent and mechanistic context dependence, contingency and higher-order interactions, ecological interaction effects, experimental design and statistics, invasive alien species, multiple stressors and global environmental change factors",
author = "Catford, {Jane A.} and Wilson, {John R.U.} and Petr Py{\v s}ek and Hulme, {Philip E.} and Duncan, {Richard P.}",
note = "Funding Information: We thank Becks Spake, Est?baliz Palma, Ren-Jay Wang, and Sarah Wyse for images in Box 1 and Kevin Mueller and an anonymous reviewer for comments that helped improve the paper. The idea for this paper stemmed from a keynote delivered by J.A.C. at the 2019 Ecology and Management of Alien Plant Invasions conference; J.A.C. thanks people for feedback on that presentation. This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No. [101002987] to J.A.C.). J.R.U.W. thanks the South African Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (DFFE) for funding, noting that the views expressed here need not represent those of DFFE or its employees. P.P. was supported by EXPRO grant No. 19-28807X (Czech Science Foundation) and long-term research development project RVO 67985939 (Czech Academy of Sciences). No interests are declared. Funding Information: We thank Becks Spake, Est{\'i}baliz Palma, Ren-Jay Wang, and Sarah Wyse for images in Box 1 and Kevin Mueller and an anonymous reviewer for comments that helped improve the paper. The idea for this paper stemmed from a keynote delivered by J.A.C. at the 2019 Ecology and Management of Alien Plant Invasions conference; J.A.C. thanks people for feedback on that presentation. This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union{\textquoteright}s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No. [ 101002987 ] to J.A.C.). J.R.U.W. thanks the South African Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (DFFE) for funding, noting that the views expressed here need not represent those of DFFE or its employees. P.P. was supported by EXPRO grant No. 19-28807X ( Czech Science Foundation ) and long-term research development project RVO 67985939 ( Czech Academy of Sciences ). Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 The Authors",
year = "2022",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1016/j.tree.2021.09.007",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "158--170",
journal = "Trends in Ecology & Evolution",
issn = "0169-5347",
publisher = "Elsevier Ltd",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Addressing context dependence in ecology

AU - Catford, Jane A.

AU - Wilson, John R.U.

AU - Pyšek, Petr

AU - Hulme, Philip E.

AU - Duncan, Richard P.

N1 - Funding Information: We thank Becks Spake, Est?baliz Palma, Ren-Jay Wang, and Sarah Wyse for images in Box 1 and Kevin Mueller and an anonymous reviewer for comments that helped improve the paper. The idea for this paper stemmed from a keynote delivered by J.A.C. at the 2019 Ecology and Management of Alien Plant Invasions conference; J.A.C. thanks people for feedback on that presentation. This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No. [101002987] to J.A.C.). J.R.U.W. thanks the South African Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (DFFE) for funding, noting that the views expressed here need not represent those of DFFE or its employees. P.P. was supported by EXPRO grant No. 19-28807X (Czech Science Foundation) and long-term research development project RVO 67985939 (Czech Academy of Sciences). No interests are declared. Funding Information: We thank Becks Spake, Estíbaliz Palma, Ren-Jay Wang, and Sarah Wyse for images in Box 1 and Kevin Mueller and an anonymous reviewer for comments that helped improve the paper. The idea for this paper stemmed from a keynote delivered by J.A.C. at the 2019 Ecology and Management of Alien Plant Invasions conference; J.A.C. thanks people for feedback on that presentation. This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No. [ 101002987 ] to J.A.C.). J.R.U.W. thanks the South African Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (DFFE) for funding, noting that the views expressed here need not represent those of DFFE or its employees. P.P. was supported by EXPRO grant No. 19-28807X ( Czech Science Foundation ) and long-term research development project RVO 67985939 ( Czech Academy of Sciences ). Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Authors

PY - 2022/2

Y1 - 2022/2

N2 - Context dependence is widely invoked to explain disparate results in ecology. It arises when the magnitude or sign of a relationship varies due to the conditions under which it is observed. Such variation, especially when unexplained, can lead to spurious or seemingly contradictory conclusions, which can limit understanding and our ability to transfer findings across studies, space, and time. Using examples from biological invasions, we identify two types of context dependence resulting from four sources: mechanistic context dependence arises from interaction effects; and apparent context dependence can arise from the presence of confounding factors, problems of statistical inference, and methodological differences among studies. Addressing context dependence is a critical challenge in ecology, essential for increased understanding and prediction.

AB - Context dependence is widely invoked to explain disparate results in ecology. It arises when the magnitude or sign of a relationship varies due to the conditions under which it is observed. Such variation, especially when unexplained, can lead to spurious or seemingly contradictory conclusions, which can limit understanding and our ability to transfer findings across studies, space, and time. Using examples from biological invasions, we identify two types of context dependence resulting from four sources: mechanistic context dependence arises from interaction effects; and apparent context dependence can arise from the presence of confounding factors, problems of statistical inference, and methodological differences among studies. Addressing context dependence is a critical challenge in ecology, essential for increased understanding and prediction.

KW - apparent and mechanistic context dependence

KW - contingency and higher-order interactions

KW - ecological interaction effects

KW - experimental design and statistics

KW - invasive alien species

KW - multiple stressors and global environmental change factors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85118331859&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.tree.2021.09.007

DO - 10.1016/j.tree.2021.09.007

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85118331859

VL - 37

SP - 158

EP - 170

JO - Trends in Ecology & Evolution

JF - Trends in Ecology & Evolution

SN - 0169-5347

IS - 2

ER -

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