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Adiponectin is associated with insulin sensitivity in white European men but not black African men

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Original languageEnglish
Article numbere14571
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
Accepted/In press2021
PublishedAug 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: This work was funded by Diabetes UK project grants: 12/0004473 and 14/0004967. Funding Information: This work was funded by Diabetes UK project grants: 12/0004473 and 14/0004967. The authors thank Cynthia Mohandas, Andrew Pernet, Bula Wilson and Marcia Henderson (research nurses, Diabetes Research Group, King's College Hospital, UK) for assisting with the metabolic assessments; Anne-Catherine Perz (King's College London, UK), Daniel Curtis (University of Surrey, UK) and Tracy Dew (Affinity biomarkers lab, UK) for assistance with sample processing and laboratory analysis; Elka Giemsa (CRF manager, King's College Hospital, UK) for accommodating the participant visits; the staff of the Clinical Research Facility at King's College Hospital for help in performing the studies and the study participants for their time and commitment. OH was supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care South London at King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health. Louise Goff is the guarantor of this work, had full access to all the data and takes full responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of data analysis. Funding Information: The authors thank Cynthia Mohandas, Andrew Pernet, Bula Wilson and Marcia Henderson (research nurses, Diabetes Research Group, King's College Hospital, UK) for assisting with the metabolic assessments; Anne‐Catherine Perz (King's College London, UK), Daniel Curtis (University of Surrey, UK) and Tracy Dew (Affinity biomarkers lab, UK) for assistance with sample processing and laboratory analysis; Elka Giemsa (CRF manager, King's College Hospital, UK) for accommodating the participant visits; the staff of the Clinical Research Facility at King's College Hospital for help in performing the studies and the study participants for their time and commitment. OH was supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care South London at King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health. Louise Goff is the guarantor of this work, had full access to all the data and takes full responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of data analysis. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

King's Authors

Abstract

Aims: We aimed to assess ethnic differences in inflammatory markers and their relationships with insulin sensitivity and regional adiposity between white European and black African men. Methods: A total of 53 white European and 53 black African men underwent assessment of inflammatory markers alongside Dixon-magnetic resonance imaging to quantify subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue and intrahepatic lipid. A hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp was used to measure whole-body and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. To assess ethnic differences in relationships, the statistical significance of an interaction term between adipokines and ethnic group was tested in multivariable regression models. Results: The black African men exhibited significantly lower adiponectin and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and greater interleukin-10 (IL-10) compared to white European men (all p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant ethnic differences in leptin, resistin, IL-6, interferon-γ, IL-13, IL-1β, IL-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Several relationships differed significantly by ethnicity such that they were stronger in white European than black African men including IL-6 with visceral adipose tissue; adiponectin with subcutaneous adipose tissue; leptin with intrahepatic lipid; adiponectin, IL-6 and TNF-α with whole-body insulin sensitivity and TNF-α with adipose tissue insulin sensitivity (all pinteraction <0.05). Leptin significantly predicted whole-body insulin sensitivity in white European (R2 = 0.51) and black African (R2 = 0.29) men; however, adiponectin was a statistically significant predictor in only white European men (R2= 0.22). Conclusions: While adiponectin is lower in black African men, its insulin sensitising effects may be greater in white men suggesting that the role of adipokines in the development of type 2 diabetes may differ by ethnicity.

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