Age-Dependent Decline in Common Femoral Artery Flow-Mediated Dilation and Wall Shear Stress in Healthy Subjects

Mariam Bapir, Gavrielle R Untracht, Julie E A Hunt, John H McVey, Jenny Harris, Simon S Skene, Paola Campagnolo, Nikolaos Dikaios, Ana Rodriguez-Mateos, David D Sampson, Danuta M Sampson, Christian Heiss

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4 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Femoral artery (FA) endothelial function is a promising biomarker of lower extremity vascular health for peripheral artery disease (PAD) prevention and treatment; however, the impact of age on FA endothelial function has not been reported in healthy adults. Therefore, we evaluated the reproducibility and acceptability of flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in the FA and brachial artery (BA) (n = 20) and performed cross-sectional FA- and BA-FMD measurements in healthy non-smokers aged 22-76 years (n = 50). FMD protocols demonstrated similar good reproducibility. Leg occlusion was deemed more uncomfortable than arm occlusion; thigh occlusion was less tolerated than forearm and calf occlusion. FA-FMD with calf occlusion was lower than BA-FMD (6.0 ± 1.1% vs 6.4 ± 1.3%, p = 0.030). Multivariate linear regression analysis indicated that age (-0.4%/decade) was a significant independent predictor of FA-FMD (R2 = 0.35, p = 0.002). The age-dependent decline in FMD did not significantly differ between FA and BA (pinteraction agexlocation = 0.388). In older participants, 40% of baseline FA wall shear stress (WSS) values were <5 dyne/cm2, which is regarded as pro-atherogenic. In conclusion, endothelial function declines similarly with age in the FA and the BA in healthy adults. The age-dependent FA enlargement results in a critical decrease in WSS that may explain part of the age-dependent predisposition for PAD.

Original languageEnglish
JournalLife
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Dec 2022

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