Ambulatory transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitoring for children with neuromuscular disease

J. Shi, J. Chiang, M. Ambreen, N. Snow, C. Mocanu, L. Mcadam, R.s. Goldstein, L. Rose, R. Amin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
26 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective
Early screening and diagnosis of nocturnal hypoventilation can slow progression to diurnal hypercapnia and mortality in children with neuromuscular disease (NMD). However, gold standard, laboratory-based polysomnography (PSG) testing is a limited resource. Therefore, we evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of ambulatory transcutaneous carbon dioxide (tcCO2) monitoring used in the home compared to PSG in children with NMD.

Methods
Prospective, cross-sectional study in children 0–18 years old with a confirmed diagnosis of NMD and a clinically indicated need for PSG. Ambulatory tcCO2 was assessed by a respiratory therapist in participant's homes. Demographics, and PSG (including tcCO2).

Results
We enrolled 39 children with NMD; 3 had unusable ambulatory tcCO2 data because of failure of drift correction on the machine (n = 2) or an air bubble (n = 1). The remaining 36 patients aged 11 months to 16 years (median (IQR) 12.5 years (6.0–15.8)) had ambulatory tcCO2 and outpatient level 1 PSG data. Ambulatory tcCO2 monitoring had a sensitivity of 20.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.5–71.6%) and a specificity of 93.5% (95% CI 78.6–99.2%). Almost all children and/or parents (34/36, 94%) preferred ambulatory monitoring over in-hospital PSG.

Conclusions
Ambulatory transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitoring was not sufficiently accurate as a clinical tool for the diagnosis of nocturnal hypoventilation our cohort of children with neuromuscular disease despite being preferred over PSG by both children and parents.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-227
Number of pages7
JournalSLEEP MEDICINE
Volume101
Early online date2 Nov 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2023

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