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An assessment of aortic stiffness indices using a model of healthy cardiovascular ageing

Research output: Contribution to journalPoster abstract

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Human Hypertension
Volume32
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2018
EventBritish and Irish Hypertension Society Annual Scientific Meeting - Cambridge, United Kingdom
Duration: 24 Sep 201826 Sep 2018

Bibliographical note

This abstract was presented as a poster at the 2018 British and Irish Hypertension Society Annual Scientific Meeting.

King's Authors

Abstract

Introduction: Over 30 arterial stiffness indices (ASIs) have been designed to assess arterial stiffness from pulse waves. However, their performances have not been directly compared, and there is evidence that they are influenced by other cardiovascular properties. Our aim was to assess their performance using a model of healthy cardiovascular ageing.

Methods: The haemodynamics of a young subject were modelled using a numerical model of blood flow. Model parameters were varied to create a population of virtual subjects aged 25 to 75 exhibiting normal physiological variation. Blood pressure and pulse oximetry pulse waves were simulated for each subject. The model was verified through comparison with in vivo measurements. ASIs were calculated using pulse wave analysis techniques. Their performances were assessed through comparison with reference aortic stiffness values using correlation and limits of agreement techniques.

Results: Most ASIs were indicative of aortic stiffness, although many were also influenced by other arterial parameters, including arterial diameter and the stiffness of other arteries, and by cardiac parameters including heart rate and stroke volume. ASIs derived from the second derivative of the pulse wave were less influenced by heart rate, but more strongly influenced by the stiffness of smaller arteries.

Conclusions: The performances of over 30 ASIs were assessed at multiple arterial sites. Performance could be improved by combining ASIs to reduce the influence of other cardiovascular properties. In the future, the database of pulse waves could be used to assess techniques for non-invasive estimation of central blood pressure and cardiac output.

Disclosures: none

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