An early-onset autosomal dominant macular dystrophy (MCDR3) resembling North Carolina macular dystrophy maps to chromosome 5

M Michaelides, S Johnson, A K Tekriwal, G E Holder, C Bellmann, E Kinning, G Woodruff, R C Trembath, D M Hunt, A T Moore

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49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE. To characterize the phenotype of an autosomal dominant macular dystrophy and identify the chromosomal locus. METHODS. Thirteen members of a four-generation, nonconsanguineous British family were examined clinically and also underwent automated perimetry, fundus fluorescein angiography, and fundus autofluorescence imaging. After informed consent was obtained, blood samples were taken for DNA extraction, and genetic linkage analysis was performed. RESULTS. The retinal changes have an early age of onset and are confined to the macular region. The macular abnormalities vary from mild retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) pigmentary change to atrophy. Drusen-like deposits are present to various degrees and are characteristic of the phenotype. Subretinal neovascular membrane (SRNVM) is an established complication. Genetic linkage analysis established linkage to chromosome 5, region p13.1-p15.33 with a maximum LOD score of 3.61 at a recombination fraction of 0.00 for marker D5S630. The locus for this autosomal dominant macular dystrophy lies between flanking markers D5S1981 and D5S2031. CONCLUSIONS. A novel locus has been identified for early-onset autosomal dominant macular dystrophy on chromosome 5
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2178 - 2183
Number of pages6
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2003

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