An interpretation of the preface to Medical Puzzles and Natural Problems 1 by Pseudo- Alexander of Aphrodisias in light of medical education

Michiel Meeusen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Among the writings of Alexander of Aphrodisias (fl. 200 AD), the famous commentator on Aristotle, there is a collection of Medical Puzzles and Natural Problems, which is generally considered spurious today.1 Finding its model in the Natural Problems ascribed to Aristotle (probably only partially authentic), the work is one of several witnesses to the revival of this branch of scientific inquiry, well known for its typical question and answer approach, in the Imperial era. Scholars agree that starting from Andronicus’ re-edition of Aristotle’s oeuvre in the first century BC, this genre gained in popularity in the first and second centuries AD and onwards.2 Other collections that have come down to us are the so-called Supplementary Problems,3 variously attributed to pseudo-Aristotle and pseudo-Alexander; the Medical Difficulties and Natural Problems, ascribed to Cassius the Iatrosophist;4 and the natural problems by Plutarch of Chaeronea (collected in his Table Talk and Causes of Natural Phenomena).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGreek Medical Literature and its Readers
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Hippocrates to Islam and Byzantium
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages94-109
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781351205269
ISBN (Print)9781472487919
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

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