Are High Performance Work Practices (HPWPs) enabling or disabling? Exploring the relationship between selected HPWPs and work-related disability disadvantage

Kim Hoque*, Victoria Wass, Nick Bacon, Melanie Jones

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We develop the organizational characteristics element of Stone and Colella's (1996) framework by drawing on the Ability–Motivation–Opportunity (AMO) model to assess the relationship between high-performance work practices (HPWPs) and work-related disability disadvantage. We develop competing “enabling” and “disabling” hypotheses concerning the influence of selected HPWPs (competency testing, performance appraisal, individual performance-related pay, teamworking, and functional flexibility) on disabled relative to nondisabled employees. An empirical assessment of these competing hypotheses using matched employer–employee data from the nationally representative British Workplace Employment Relations Study 2011 reveals a negative relationship between these HPWPs when used in combination and the proportion of disabled employees at the workplace, although this relationship disappears in workplaces with a wide range of disability equality practices. While disabled employees report lower work-related well-being than their nondisabled counterparts, we find limited evidence that this is associated with the presence of HPWPs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)499-513
JournalHUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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