Are walking treatment beliefs and illness perceptions associated with walking intention and 6-min walk distance in people with intermittent claudication? A cross-sectional study

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Abstract

Intermittent claudication (IC) is debilitating leg pain affecting older people with peripheral arterial disease, which is improved by regular walking. This study evaluated associations between psychosocial variables and 6-Minute Walk Distance (6MWD) to identify factors that motivate walking. 142 Individuals with IC (116 males, mean 66.9y [SD=10.2]) completed cross-sectional assessments of sociodemographics, walking treatment beliefs and intention (Theory of Planned Behaviour [TPB]), illness perceptions (Revised Illness Perceptions Questionnaire), and 6MWD. Multiple linear regression evaluated relationships between treatment beliefs (block 1) and illness perceptions (block 2) with intention and 6MWD. TPB constructs were associated with intention (R=.72, p<.001) and 6MWD (R=.08, p<.001). Illness perceptions were associated with 6MWD only (R=.27, p<.001). Intention (β=.26), treatment control (β=-.27), personal control (β=.32), coherence (β=.18), and risk factor attributions (β=.22; all p<0.05) were independently associated with 6MWD. Treatment beliefs and illness perceptions associated with intention and 6MWD in people with IC are potential intervention targets.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)473-481
Number of pages9
JournalJOURNAL OF AGING AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
Volume27
Issue number4
Early online date13 Mar 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Behavior change
  • Illness representations
  • Walking capacity

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