Are women who have abortions different from those who do not? A secondary analysis of the 1990 national survey of sexual attitudes and lifestyles

G Barrett*, J Peacock, CR Victor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies of women undergoing termination of a pregnancy are often used to make recommendations about family planning and health education policy. However, it is not clear how similar the women in these studies are to the general population of women of childbearing age. Our secondary analysis of the National Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles Survey allowed us to test the hypothesis that women who have undergone an abortion are the same as those who have not (in terms of socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyles, and attitudes). Our findings show significant differences between these two groups of women, particularly regarding ethnicity, marital status, number of natural children, lifetime number of sexual partners, and attitudes to abortion. We conclude that family planning/reproductive health services and health education policies need to take these differences into account and that further research is required to explain why these differences arise.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberN/A
Pages (from-to)157-163
Number of pages7
JournalPublic Health
Volume112
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1998

Keywords

  • abortion
  • sexual behaviour
  • contraception
  • ethnicity
  • INJECTING DRUG-USERS
  • UNPLANNED PREGNANCY
  • CONTRACEPTIVE PRACTICES
  • SEEKING TERMINATION
  • BEHAVIOR
  • FAILURE

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Are women who have abortions different from those who do not? A secondary analysis of the 1990 national survey of sexual attitudes and lifestyles'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this