Arterial pulse wave propagation across stenoses and aneurysms: assessment of one-dimensional simulations against three-dimensional simulations and in vitro measurements

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Abstract

One-dimensional (1-D) arterial blood flow modelling was tested in a series of idealized vascular geometries representing the abdominal aorta, common carotid and iliac arteries with different sizes of stenoses and/or aneurysms. Three-dimensional (3-D) modelling and in vitro measurements were used as ground truth to assess the accuracy of 1-D model pressure and flow waves. The 1-D and 3-D formulations shared identical boundary conditions and had equivalent vascular geometries and material properties. The parameters of an experimental set-up of the abdominal aorta for different aneurysm sizes were matched in corresponding 1-D models. Results show the ability of 1-D modelling to capture the main features of pressure and flow waves, pressure drop across the stenoses and energy dissipation across aneurysms observed in the 3-D and experimental models. Under physiological Reynolds numbers (Re), root mean square errors were smaller than 5.4% for pressure and 7.3% for the flow, for stenosis and aneurysm sizes of up to 85% and 400%, respectively. Relative errors increased with the increasing stenosis and aneurysm size, aneurysm length and Re, and decreasing stenosis length. All data generated in this study are freely available and provide a valuable resource for future research.

Original languageEnglish
Article number0881
Pages (from-to)20200881
Number of pages1
JournalJournal of the Royal Society, Interface
Volume18
Issue number177
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2021

Keywords

  • computational fluid dynamics
  • haemodynamics
  • in vitro measurements
  • mathematical modelling
  • pulse wave propagation

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