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Arts and creativity: A business and branding strategy for Lodz as a neoliberal city

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Arts and creativity : A business and branding strategy for Lodz as a neoliberal city. / Cudny, Waldemar; Comunian, Roberta; Wolaniuk, Anita.

In: CITIES, Vol. 100, 102659, 05.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Cudny, W, Comunian, R & Wolaniuk, A 2020, 'Arts and creativity: A business and branding strategy for Lodz as a neoliberal city', CITIES, vol. 100, 102659. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cities.2020.102659

APA

Cudny, W., Comunian, R., & Wolaniuk, A. (2020). Arts and creativity: A business and branding strategy for Lodz as a neoliberal city. CITIES, 100, [102659]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cities.2020.102659

Vancouver

Cudny W, Comunian R, Wolaniuk A. Arts and creativity: A business and branding strategy for Lodz as a neoliberal city. CITIES. 2020 May;100. 102659. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cities.2020.102659

Author

Cudny, Waldemar ; Comunian, Roberta ; Wolaniuk, Anita. / Arts and creativity : A business and branding strategy for Lodz as a neoliberal city. In: CITIES. 2020 ; Vol. 100.

Bibtex Download

@article{e47a64c886f9452280ef856af1e04a99,
title = "Arts and creativity: A business and branding strategy for Lodz as a neoliberal city",
abstract = "This article builds on the current critique of urban neoliberal strategies for global competition that make instrumental use of arts and creativity. This paper moves the debate forward by providing a more holistic overview of why cities exploit arts and creativity as a business development strategy. It translates the arguments often used in the literature on corporate investment in arts to consider how investment in arts and creativity at an urban level aim to affect not only promotion and marketing, but also influence public relations and corporate social responsibility, prompt new production and research and innovation and boost local human resources for the local economy. Cities invest in cultural development, arts, creative industries, festivals and other events to develop a range of opportunities and as an overall strategy to engage in global urban competition, behaving like companies who try to differentiate themselves in the market by investing in creativity and sponsoring arts events. To illustrate the similarity between urban policies and business strategies we use the case study of Ł{\'o}dź, a Polish post-industrial city, where creative industries have recently become leading urban development drivers.",
keywords = "City branding, Creative city, Creative industries, Neoliberalism, Promotion, Ł{\'o}dź",
author = "Waldemar Cudny and Roberta Comunian and Anita Wolaniuk",
year = "2020",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.cities.2020.102659",
language = "English",
volume = "100",
journal = "CITIES",
issn = "0264-2751",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Arts and creativity

T2 - A business and branding strategy for Lodz as a neoliberal city

AU - Cudny, Waldemar

AU - Comunian, Roberta

AU - Wolaniuk, Anita

PY - 2020/5

Y1 - 2020/5

N2 - This article builds on the current critique of urban neoliberal strategies for global competition that make instrumental use of arts and creativity. This paper moves the debate forward by providing a more holistic overview of why cities exploit arts and creativity as a business development strategy. It translates the arguments often used in the literature on corporate investment in arts to consider how investment in arts and creativity at an urban level aim to affect not only promotion and marketing, but also influence public relations and corporate social responsibility, prompt new production and research and innovation and boost local human resources for the local economy. Cities invest in cultural development, arts, creative industries, festivals and other events to develop a range of opportunities and as an overall strategy to engage in global urban competition, behaving like companies who try to differentiate themselves in the market by investing in creativity and sponsoring arts events. To illustrate the similarity between urban policies and business strategies we use the case study of Łódź, a Polish post-industrial city, where creative industries have recently become leading urban development drivers.

AB - This article builds on the current critique of urban neoliberal strategies for global competition that make instrumental use of arts and creativity. This paper moves the debate forward by providing a more holistic overview of why cities exploit arts and creativity as a business development strategy. It translates the arguments often used in the literature on corporate investment in arts to consider how investment in arts and creativity at an urban level aim to affect not only promotion and marketing, but also influence public relations and corporate social responsibility, prompt new production and research and innovation and boost local human resources for the local economy. Cities invest in cultural development, arts, creative industries, festivals and other events to develop a range of opportunities and as an overall strategy to engage in global urban competition, behaving like companies who try to differentiate themselves in the market by investing in creativity and sponsoring arts events. To illustrate the similarity between urban policies and business strategies we use the case study of Łódź, a Polish post-industrial city, where creative industries have recently become leading urban development drivers.

KW - City branding

KW - Creative city

KW - Creative industries

KW - Neoliberalism

KW - Promotion

KW - Łódź

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85080934391&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cities.2020.102659

DO - 10.1016/j.cities.2020.102659

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85080934391

VL - 100

JO - CITIES

JF - CITIES

SN - 0264-2751

M1 - 102659

ER -

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