Association of dietary and nutritional factors with cognitive decline, dementia, and depressive symptomatology in older individuals according to a neurogenesis-centred biological susceptibility to brain ageing

Andrea Du Preez, Sophie Lefèvre-Arbogast, Raúl González-Domínguez, Vikki Houghton, Chiara De Lucia, Hyunah Lee, Dorrain Y. Low, Catherine Helmer, Catherine Feart, Cécile Delcourt, Cécile Proust-Lima, Mercè Pallàs, Alex Sánchez-Pla, Mireia Urpi-Sardà, Silvie R. Ruigrok, Barbara Altendorfer, Ludwig Aigner, Paul J. Lucassen, Aniko Korosi, Claudine ManachCristina Andres-Lacueva, Cécilia Samieri, Sandrine Thuret*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Hippocampal neurogenesis (HN) occurs throughout the life course and is important for memory and mood. Declining with age, HN plays a pivotal role in cognitive decline (CD), dementia, and late-life depression, such that altered HN could represent a neurobiological susceptibility to these conditions. Pertinently, dietary patterns (e.g., Mediterranean diet) and/or individual nutrients (e.g., vitamin D, omega-3) can modify HN, but also modify risk for CD, dementia, and depression. Therefore, the interaction between diet/nutrition and HN may alter risk trajectories for these ageing-related brain conditions.

Using a subsample (n=371) of the Three-City cohort – where older adults provided information on diet and blood biobanking at baseline and were assessed for CD, dementia, and depressive symptomatology across 12 years - we tested for interactions between food consumption, nutrient intake, and nutritional biomarker concentrations and neurogenesis-centred susceptibility status (defined by baseline readouts of hippocampal progenitor cell integrity, cell death and differentiation ) on CD, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), vascular and other dementias (VoD), and depressive symptomatology, using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models.

Increased plasma lycopene concentrations (OR[95% CI]=1.07[1.01, 1.14]), higher red meat (OR[95% CI]=1.10[1.03, 1.19]) and lower poultry consumption (OR[95% CI]=0.93[0.87, 0.99]) were associated with an increased risk for AD in individuals with neurogenesis-centred susceptibility. Increased vitamin D consumption (OR[95% CI]=1.05[1.01, 1.11]) and plasma γ-tocopherol concentrations (OR[95% CI]=1.08[1.01, 1.18]) were associated with increased risk for VoD and depressive symptomatology, respectively, but only in susceptible individuals.
This research highlights an important role for diet/nutrition in modifying dementia and depression risk in individuals with a neurogenesis-centred susceptibility.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAge and Ageing
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 16 Feb 2024

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Hippocampal Neurogenesis
  • Cognitive decline
  • Dementia
  • Late-life depression
  • older people

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Association of dietary and nutritional factors with cognitive decline, dementia, and depressive symptomatology in older individuals according to a neurogenesis-centred biological susceptibility to brain ageing'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this