Associations between air pollutants and blood pressure in an ethnically diverse cohort of adolescents in London, England

A Karamanos, Y Lu, I S Mudway, S Ayis, F J Kelly, S D Beevers, D Dajnak, D Fecht, C Elia, S Tandon, A J Webb, A J Grande, O R Molaodi, M J Maynard, J K Cruickshank, S Harding

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Longitudinal evidence on the association between air pollution and blood pressure (BP) in adolescence is scarce. We explored this association in an ethnically diverse cohort of schoolchildren. Sex-stratified, linear random-effects modelling was used to examine how modelled residential exposure to annual average nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter (PM2.5, PM10) and ozone (O3), measures in μg/m3, associated with blood pressure. Estimates were based on 3,284 adolescents; 80% from ethnic minority groups, recruited from 51 schools, and followed up from 11-13 to 14-16 years old. Ethnic minorities were exposed to higher modelled annual average concentrations of pollution at residential postcode level than their White UK peers. A two-pollutant model (NO2 & PM2.5), adjusted for ethnicity, age, anthropometry, and pubertal status, highlighted associations with systolic, but not diastolic BP. A μg/m3 increase in NO2 was associated with a 0.30 mmHg (95% CI 0.18 to 0.40) decrease in systolic BP for girls and 0.19 mmHg (95% CI 0.07 to 0.31) decrease in systolic BP for boys. In contrast, a 1 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 was associated with 1.34 mmHg (95% CI 0.85 to 1.82) increase in systolic BP for girls and 0.57 mmHg (95% CI 0.04 to 1.03) increase in systolic BP for boys. Associations did not vary by ethnicity, body size or socio-economic advantage. Associations were robust to adjustments for noise levels and lung function at 11-13 years. In summary, higher ambient levels of NO2 were associated with lower and PM2.5 with higher systolic BP across adolescence, with stronger associations for girls.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0279719
Pages (from-to)e0279719
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume18
Issue number2 February
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Feb 2023

Keywords

  • Male
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Adolescent
  • Child
  • Air Pollutants/adverse effects
  • Blood Pressure
  • Nitrogen Dioxide/analysis
  • London
  • Ethnicity
  • Environmental Exposure/adverse effects
  • Minority Groups
  • Air Pollution/adverse effects
  • Particulate Matter/adverse effects
  • Ozone/adverse effects
  • England/epidemiology

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