Associations between sociodemographic characteristics and receipt of professional diagnosis in Common Mental Disorder: Results from the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2014

Nadezhda Bogdanova, Claudia Cooper, Gargie Ahmad, Sally McManus, Natalie Shoham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many people with Common Mental Disorders (CMDs), especially men, people from older age groups, and ethnic minority backgrounds, receive no treatment. Self-acknowledgement of mental illness symptoms, and a professional diagnosis are usually required to access treatment. To understand barriers, we therefore tested whether these groups were relatively less likely to self-diagnose a CMD, or to receive a professional diagnosis. We analysed data from the 2014 English Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (APMS). We used regression models to examine whether gender, age, and minority ethnic status were associated with professional and self-diagnosis, after controlling for CMD symptoms. 27.3 % of the population reported a professional and self-diagnosis of CMD, 15.9 % a self- diagnosis only, and the remainder no diagnosis. Odds of professional diagnosis were lower for men compared with women (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.54, 95 % confidence intervals [CI] 0.47-0.62). People from White Other (0.49, 0.36-0.67), Black (0.31, 0.18-0.51), and Asian (0.22, 0.15-0.33) groups were less likely than the White British group to receive a professional diagnosis. The least likely age group to have a professional CMD diagnosis (relative to adults aged 16-34) were people aged over 75 (0.52, 0.39-0.69). Patterns were similar for self-diagnosis. Ethnicity categories were heterogeneous. Data are cross-sectional, and selection and response bias are possible. For every three people who self-diagnose CMD, two have a professional diagnosis. Men, ethnic minority, and older age groups are less likely to receive a diagnosis or self-diagnose after adjustment for presence of symptoms. [Abstract copyright: Copyright © 2022. Published by Elsevier B.V.]
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)112-118
JournalJournal of affective disorders
Volume319
Early online date22 Sept 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 22 Sept 2022

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Diagnosis
  • Common Mental Disorders
  • Ethnicity
  • Age

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