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Atypical effects of incorporated surfactants on stability and dissolution properties of amorphous polymeric dispersions

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Atypical effects of incorporated surfactants on stability and dissolution properties of amorphous polymeric dispersions. / Al-Obaidi, Hisham; Lawrence, M. Jayne; Buckton, Graham.

In: Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Vol. 68, No. 11, 01.11.2016, p. 1373-1383.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Al-Obaidi, H, Lawrence, MJ & Buckton, G 2016, 'Atypical effects of incorporated surfactants on stability and dissolution properties of amorphous polymeric dispersions', Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, vol. 68, no. 11, pp. 1373-1383. https://doi.org/10.1111/jphp.12645

APA

Al-Obaidi, H., Lawrence, M. J., & Buckton, G. (2016). Atypical effects of incorporated surfactants on stability and dissolution properties of amorphous polymeric dispersions. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 68(11), 1373-1383. https://doi.org/10.1111/jphp.12645

Vancouver

Al-Obaidi H, Lawrence MJ, Buckton G. Atypical effects of incorporated surfactants on stability and dissolution properties of amorphous polymeric dispersions. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology. 2016 Nov 1;68(11):1373-1383. https://doi.org/10.1111/jphp.12645

Author

Al-Obaidi, Hisham ; Lawrence, M. Jayne ; Buckton, Graham. / Atypical effects of incorporated surfactants on stability and dissolution properties of amorphous polymeric dispersions. In: Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology. 2016 ; Vol. 68, No. 11. pp. 1373-1383.

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@article{c4282aa7793e4d91aa1c4b5dc79fcbf2,
title = "Atypical effects of incorporated surfactants on stability and dissolution properties of amorphous polymeric dispersions",
abstract = "Objectives: To understand the impact of ionic and non-ionic surfactants on the dissolution and stability properties of amorphous polymeric dispersions using griseofulvin (GF) as a model for poorly soluble drugs. Methods: Solid dispersions of the poorly water-soluble drug, griseofulvin (GF) and the polymers, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) (PHPMA), have been prepared by spray drying and bead milling and the effect of the ionic and non-ionic surfactants, namely sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and Tween-80, on the physico-chemical properties of the solid dispersions studied. Key findings: The X-ray powder diffraction data and hot-stage microscopy showed a fast re-crystallisation of GF. While dynamic vapour sorption (DVS) measurements indicated an increased water uptake, slow dissolution rates were observed for the solid dispersions incorporating surfactants. The order by which surfactants free dispersions were prepared seemed critical as indicated by DVS and thermal analysis. Dispersions prepared by milling with SDS showed significantly better stability than spray-dried dispersions (drug remained amorphous for more than 6 months) as well as improved dissolution profile. Conclusions: We suggest that surfactants can hinder the dissolution by promoting aggregation of polymeric chains, however that effect depends mainly on how the particles were prepared.",
keywords = "dissolution rate, glass transition temperature, globules, solid dispersions, spray drying, surfactants",
author = "Hisham Al-Obaidi and Lawrence, {M. Jayne} and Graham Buckton",
year = "2016",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/jphp.12645",
language = "English",
volume = "68",
pages = "1373--1383",
journal = "Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology",
issn = "0022-3573",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "11",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Atypical effects of incorporated surfactants on stability and dissolution properties of amorphous polymeric dispersions

AU - Al-Obaidi, Hisham

AU - Lawrence, M. Jayne

AU - Buckton, Graham

PY - 2016/11/1

Y1 - 2016/11/1

N2 - Objectives: To understand the impact of ionic and non-ionic surfactants on the dissolution and stability properties of amorphous polymeric dispersions using griseofulvin (GF) as a model for poorly soluble drugs. Methods: Solid dispersions of the poorly water-soluble drug, griseofulvin (GF) and the polymers, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) (PHPMA), have been prepared by spray drying and bead milling and the effect of the ionic and non-ionic surfactants, namely sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and Tween-80, on the physico-chemical properties of the solid dispersions studied. Key findings: The X-ray powder diffraction data and hot-stage microscopy showed a fast re-crystallisation of GF. While dynamic vapour sorption (DVS) measurements indicated an increased water uptake, slow dissolution rates were observed for the solid dispersions incorporating surfactants. The order by which surfactants free dispersions were prepared seemed critical as indicated by DVS and thermal analysis. Dispersions prepared by milling with SDS showed significantly better stability than spray-dried dispersions (drug remained amorphous for more than 6 months) as well as improved dissolution profile. Conclusions: We suggest that surfactants can hinder the dissolution by promoting aggregation of polymeric chains, however that effect depends mainly on how the particles were prepared.

AB - Objectives: To understand the impact of ionic and non-ionic surfactants on the dissolution and stability properties of amorphous polymeric dispersions using griseofulvin (GF) as a model for poorly soluble drugs. Methods: Solid dispersions of the poorly water-soluble drug, griseofulvin (GF) and the polymers, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) (PHPMA), have been prepared by spray drying and bead milling and the effect of the ionic and non-ionic surfactants, namely sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and Tween-80, on the physico-chemical properties of the solid dispersions studied. Key findings: The X-ray powder diffraction data and hot-stage microscopy showed a fast re-crystallisation of GF. While dynamic vapour sorption (DVS) measurements indicated an increased water uptake, slow dissolution rates were observed for the solid dispersions incorporating surfactants. The order by which surfactants free dispersions were prepared seemed critical as indicated by DVS and thermal analysis. Dispersions prepared by milling with SDS showed significantly better stability than spray-dried dispersions (drug remained amorphous for more than 6 months) as well as improved dissolution profile. Conclusions: We suggest that surfactants can hinder the dissolution by promoting aggregation of polymeric chains, however that effect depends mainly on how the particles were prepared.

KW - dissolution rate

KW - glass transition temperature

KW - globules

KW - solid dispersions

KW - spray drying

KW - surfactants

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84990190395&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jphp.12645

DO - 10.1111/jphp.12645

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84990190395

VL - 68

SP - 1373

EP - 1383

JO - Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology

JF - Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology

SN - 0022-3573

IS - 11

ER -

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