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Bitcoin: Speculative Bubble, Financial Risk and Regulatory Response

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Bitcoin : Speculative Bubble, Financial Risk and Regulatory Response. / Lu, Lerong.

In: BUTTERWORTHS JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL BANKING AND FINANCIAL LAW, Vol. 33, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 178-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Lu, L 2018, 'Bitcoin: Speculative Bubble, Financial Risk and Regulatory Response', BUTTERWORTHS JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL BANKING AND FINANCIAL LAW, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 178-182.

APA

Lu, L. (2018). Bitcoin: Speculative Bubble, Financial Risk and Regulatory Response. BUTTERWORTHS JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL BANKING AND FINANCIAL LAW, 33(3), 178-182.

Vancouver

Lu L. Bitcoin: Speculative Bubble, Financial Risk and Regulatory Response. BUTTERWORTHS JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL BANKING AND FINANCIAL LAW. 2018 Mar 1;33(3):178-182.

Author

Lu, Lerong. / Bitcoin : Speculative Bubble, Financial Risk and Regulatory Response. In: BUTTERWORTHS JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL BANKING AND FINANCIAL LAW. 2018 ; Vol. 33, No. 3. pp. 178-182.

Bibtex Download

@article{df814e021a5d43acb7fb6662a49b09d5,
title = "Bitcoin: Speculative Bubble, Financial Risk and Regulatory Response",
abstract = "In this article, the author tracks developments in bitcoin trading and considers regulatory responses. 2017 has witnessed a so-called bitcoin bubble, as entrepreneurs and professional investors rushed into the market to take a bet on the upcoming cryptocurrency age. The price of a bitcoin exceeded $19,300 in December 2017, worth only $0.06 in July 2010. The popularity of bitcoin mining and trading activities has raised legal and regulatory concerns pertaining to anti-money laundering, evasion of forex regulations, the illegal fundraising of start-ups by Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs), as well as a potential financial crisis. Global financial regulators have acted proactively to regulate bitcoin. Most recently, China, once accounting for 90% of bitcoin trading volume, issued an immediate ban of ICOs and ordered the reorganisation of three major bitcoin exchanges: OKCoin, Huobi and BTCC. Over-The-Counter (OTC) transactions have not been affected. Financial authorities in certain countries have been testing state-backed cryptocurrencies.",
keywords = "bitcoin, cryptocurrency, virtual currency, financial bubble, financial risk, financial crisis, financial regulation, initial coin offering, ICO, money laundering, law and finance, law and economics",
author = "Lerong Lu",
year = "2018",
month = mar,
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "178--182",
journal = "BUTTERWORTHS JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL BANKING AND FINANCIAL LAW",
issn = "0269-2694",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bitcoin

T2 - Speculative Bubble, Financial Risk and Regulatory Response

AU - Lu, Lerong

PY - 2018/3/1

Y1 - 2018/3/1

N2 - In this article, the author tracks developments in bitcoin trading and considers regulatory responses. 2017 has witnessed a so-called bitcoin bubble, as entrepreneurs and professional investors rushed into the market to take a bet on the upcoming cryptocurrency age. The price of a bitcoin exceeded $19,300 in December 2017, worth only $0.06 in July 2010. The popularity of bitcoin mining and trading activities has raised legal and regulatory concerns pertaining to anti-money laundering, evasion of forex regulations, the illegal fundraising of start-ups by Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs), as well as a potential financial crisis. Global financial regulators have acted proactively to regulate bitcoin. Most recently, China, once accounting for 90% of bitcoin trading volume, issued an immediate ban of ICOs and ordered the reorganisation of three major bitcoin exchanges: OKCoin, Huobi and BTCC. Over-The-Counter (OTC) transactions have not been affected. Financial authorities in certain countries have been testing state-backed cryptocurrencies.

AB - In this article, the author tracks developments in bitcoin trading and considers regulatory responses. 2017 has witnessed a so-called bitcoin bubble, as entrepreneurs and professional investors rushed into the market to take a bet on the upcoming cryptocurrency age. The price of a bitcoin exceeded $19,300 in December 2017, worth only $0.06 in July 2010. The popularity of bitcoin mining and trading activities has raised legal and regulatory concerns pertaining to anti-money laundering, evasion of forex regulations, the illegal fundraising of start-ups by Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs), as well as a potential financial crisis. Global financial regulators have acted proactively to regulate bitcoin. Most recently, China, once accounting for 90% of bitcoin trading volume, issued an immediate ban of ICOs and ordered the reorganisation of three major bitcoin exchanges: OKCoin, Huobi and BTCC. Over-The-Counter (OTC) transactions have not been affected. Financial authorities in certain countries have been testing state-backed cryptocurrencies.

KW - bitcoin

KW - cryptocurrency

KW - virtual currency

KW - financial bubble

KW - financial risk

KW - financial crisis

KW - financial regulation

KW - initial coin offering

KW - ICO

KW - money laundering

KW - law and finance

KW - law and economics

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 178

EP - 182

JO - BUTTERWORTHS JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL BANKING AND FINANCIAL LAW

JF - BUTTERWORTHS JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL BANKING AND FINANCIAL LAW

SN - 0269-2694

IS - 3

ER -

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