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Caching as an Image Characterization Problem using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperpeer-review

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2020 IEEE International Conference on Communications, ICC 2020 - Proceedings
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9781728150895
DOIs
PublishedJun 2020
Event2020 IEEE International Conference on Communications, ICC 2020 - Dublin, Ireland
Duration: 7 Jun 202011 Jun 2020

Publication series

NameIEEE International Conference on Communications
Volume2020-June
ISSN (Print)1550-3607

Conference

Conference2020 IEEE International Conference on Communications, ICC 2020
CountryIreland
CityDublin
Period7/06/202011/06/2020

King's Authors

Abstract

Caching of popular content closer to the mobile user can significantly increase overall user experience as well as network efficiency by decongesting backbone network segments in the case of congestion episodes. In order to find the optimal caching locations, many conventional approaches rely on solving a complex optimization problem that suffers from the curse of dimensionality, which may fail to support online decision making. In this paper we propose a framework to amalgamate model based optimization with data driven techniques by transforming an optimization problem to a grayscale image and train a convolutional neural network (CNN) to predict optimal caching location policies. The rationale for the proposed modelling comes from CNN's superiority to capture features in grayscale images reaching human level performance in image recognition problems. The CNN is trained with optimal solutions and numerical investigations reveal that the performance can increase by more than 400 compared to powerful randomized greedy algorithms. To this end, the proposed technique seems as a promising way forward to the holy grail aspect in resource orchestration which is providing high quality decision making in real time.

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