Cadaver validation of the use of ultrasound for 3D model instantiation of bony anatomy in image guided orthopaedic surgery

C Barillot (Editor), D R Haynor, P Hellier (Editor), G P Penney, M Slomczykowski, T J Carter, D J Hawkes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paper

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present cadaver validation of a method that uses tracked ultrasound to instantiate and register 3D statistical shape models (SSMs) of 3 femurs and 2 pelves. The SSMs were generated directly from the deformation fields obtained from non-rigid registration of CT images to a single target CT image. Ultrasound images were obtained from three intact cadavers. These were used to instantiate the model by iteratively minimising the RMS distance between the model surface and the ultrasound-derived bone surface points. The RMS distance between the instantiated model surface and the CT-derived bone surface was less than 3.72 mm in the region of the femoral head and acetabulum. We conclude that SSMs of the femur and pelvis may be instantiated and registered to surgical space to within a clinically acceptable accuracy using intraoperative ultrasound. This potentially could reduce the invasiveness of orthopaedic procedures, and remove the requirement for a preoperative CT scan.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLECT NOTE COMPUT SCI
Place of PublicationBERLIN
PublisherSpringer
Pages397 - 404
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)3-540-22977-9
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Event7th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention (MICCAI 2004) - St Malo, France
Duration: 1 Jan 2004 → …

Publication series

NameLECTURE NOTES IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

Conference

Conference7th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention (MICCAI 2004)
Country/TerritoryFrance
CitySt Malo
Period1/01/2004 → …

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cadaver validation of the use of ultrasound for 3D model instantiation of bony anatomy in image guided orthopaedic surgery'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this