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Calibration accuracy of hospital-based non-invasive blood pressure measuring devices

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Calibration accuracy of hospital-based non-invasive blood pressure measuring devices. / de Greeff, A.; Lorde, I.; Wilton, A.; Seed, P.; Coleman, Andy; Shennan, A. H.

In: Journal of Human Hypertension, Vol. 24, No. 1, 02.04.2010, p. 58 - 63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

de Greeff, A, Lorde, I, Wilton, A, Seed, P, Coleman, A & Shennan, AH 2010, 'Calibration accuracy of hospital-based non-invasive blood pressure measuring devices', Journal of Human Hypertension, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 58 - 63. https://doi.org/10.1038/jhh.2009.29

APA

de Greeff, A., Lorde, I., Wilton, A., Seed, P., Coleman, A., & Shennan, A. H. (2010). Calibration accuracy of hospital-based non-invasive blood pressure measuring devices. Journal of Human Hypertension, 24(1), 58 - 63. https://doi.org/10.1038/jhh.2009.29

Vancouver

de Greeff A, Lorde I, Wilton A, Seed P, Coleman A, Shennan AH. Calibration accuracy of hospital-based non-invasive blood pressure measuring devices. Journal of Human Hypertension. 2010 Apr 2;24(1):58 - 63. https://doi.org/10.1038/jhh.2009.29

Author

de Greeff, A. ; Lorde, I. ; Wilton, A. ; Seed, P. ; Coleman, Andy ; Shennan, A. H. / Calibration accuracy of hospital-based non-invasive blood pressure measuring devices. In: Journal of Human Hypertension. 2010 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. 58 - 63.

Bibtex Download

@article{09bff0ae130a4de4902b7f30f44428cc,
title = "Calibration accuracy of hospital-based non-invasive blood pressure measuring devices",
abstract = "Accurate blood pressure (BP) measurement is dependent on a trained observer using validated and properly maintained equipment. BP devices should be checked regularly to ensure that their calibration remains within the European Standard specification of +/- 3 mm Hg. This study assessed the air leakage rates and calibration accuracy of BP devices in use at a large teaching hospital, using a calibrated electronic pressure gauge as reference. Air leakage rates were recorded over 1 min and static pressures were recorded at 250/200/150/100/50/0 mm Hg for computer download and analysis. A total of 127 devices were assessed (18 mercury, 62 aneroid and 47 automated). In total, 22 different models of devices were available, of which 11 were automated and only 4 had published evidence of a validation using a recognized protocol (British Hypertension Society, Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation or International Protocol). Only 3{\%} (n=4) of devices had an air leakage rate within 4 mm Hg per min and 25{\%} (n=32) of devices failed to meet the European calibration standard of +/- 3 mm Hg. Respective failure rates were 6{\%} (1/18) for mercury, 31{\%} (19/62) for aneroid and 26{\%} (12/47) for automated devices. Inaccurate BP measurement of only 3 mm Hg can have detrimental effects in the patient. This study shows a quarter of devices currently in use at a large teaching hospital to have an unacceptable calibration error. Regular maintenance and calibration checks are vital in ensuring that BP is measured as accurately as possible.",
author = "{de Greeff}, A. and I. Lorde and A. Wilton and P. Seed and Andy Coleman and Shennan, {A. H.}",
year = "2010",
month = "4",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1038/jhh.2009.29",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "58 -- 63",
journal = "Journal of Human Hypertension",
issn = "0950-9240",
publisher = "Macmillan Publishers Limited SN -",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Calibration accuracy of hospital-based non-invasive blood pressure measuring devices

AU - de Greeff, A.

AU - Lorde, I.

AU - Wilton, A.

AU - Seed, P.

AU - Coleman, Andy

AU - Shennan, A. H.

PY - 2010/4/2

Y1 - 2010/4/2

N2 - Accurate blood pressure (BP) measurement is dependent on a trained observer using validated and properly maintained equipment. BP devices should be checked regularly to ensure that their calibration remains within the European Standard specification of +/- 3 mm Hg. This study assessed the air leakage rates and calibration accuracy of BP devices in use at a large teaching hospital, using a calibrated electronic pressure gauge as reference. Air leakage rates were recorded over 1 min and static pressures were recorded at 250/200/150/100/50/0 mm Hg for computer download and analysis. A total of 127 devices were assessed (18 mercury, 62 aneroid and 47 automated). In total, 22 different models of devices were available, of which 11 were automated and only 4 had published evidence of a validation using a recognized protocol (British Hypertension Society, Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation or International Protocol). Only 3% (n=4) of devices had an air leakage rate within 4 mm Hg per min and 25% (n=32) of devices failed to meet the European calibration standard of +/- 3 mm Hg. Respective failure rates were 6% (1/18) for mercury, 31% (19/62) for aneroid and 26% (12/47) for automated devices. Inaccurate BP measurement of only 3 mm Hg can have detrimental effects in the patient. This study shows a quarter of devices currently in use at a large teaching hospital to have an unacceptable calibration error. Regular maintenance and calibration checks are vital in ensuring that BP is measured as accurately as possible.

AB - Accurate blood pressure (BP) measurement is dependent on a trained observer using validated and properly maintained equipment. BP devices should be checked regularly to ensure that their calibration remains within the European Standard specification of +/- 3 mm Hg. This study assessed the air leakage rates and calibration accuracy of BP devices in use at a large teaching hospital, using a calibrated electronic pressure gauge as reference. Air leakage rates were recorded over 1 min and static pressures were recorded at 250/200/150/100/50/0 mm Hg for computer download and analysis. A total of 127 devices were assessed (18 mercury, 62 aneroid and 47 automated). In total, 22 different models of devices were available, of which 11 were automated and only 4 had published evidence of a validation using a recognized protocol (British Hypertension Society, Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation or International Protocol). Only 3% (n=4) of devices had an air leakage rate within 4 mm Hg per min and 25% (n=32) of devices failed to meet the European calibration standard of +/- 3 mm Hg. Respective failure rates were 6% (1/18) for mercury, 31% (19/62) for aneroid and 26% (12/47) for automated devices. Inaccurate BP measurement of only 3 mm Hg can have detrimental effects in the patient. This study shows a quarter of devices currently in use at a large teaching hospital to have an unacceptable calibration error. Regular maintenance and calibration checks are vital in ensuring that BP is measured as accurately as possible.

U2 - 10.1038/jhh.2009.29

DO - 10.1038/jhh.2009.29

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 58

EP - 63

JO - Journal of Human Hypertension

JF - Journal of Human Hypertension

SN - 0950-9240

IS - 1

ER -

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