Care home staff perceptions of implementing a quality of life instrument into routine care practice: A qualitative study

Laura J. Hughes*, Stephanie Daley, Nicolas Farina, Naji Tabet, Sube Banerjee

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Quality of life is an important outcome in older-adult care. Measuring resident quality of life may offer ways to improve it and to improve quality of care. However, in the UK quality of life is rarely measured as a part of routine care. Our study aimed to understand the views of care home staff about using a quality of life instrument as a part of routine care in order to support its implementation into routine practice. In a qualitative study, we conducted 35 interviews with care home staff and two focus groups with four care home managers from three care homes in East Sussex, England. Data were collected between September 2015 and February 2016. Care staff and managers were aged on average 40 (SD = 12.2) and 43.7 (SD = 14.4) years and had worked in the care sector an average of 11.4 (SD = 10.2) and 23.7 (SD = 14.1) years, respectively. Participants were predominantly female and white British. Interviews and focus groups were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings identified two overarching themes of 'Perceived gains' and 'Implementation'. Overall, there was a lot of positivity towards using a quality of life instrument in routine practice. This positivity was an important feature in how the instrument was perceived as fitting into practice. Participants identified several barriers and discussed how to overcome them. Results from the study demonstrate that routine measurement of quality of life is positively received by care staff. They believed that measuring quality of life as a part of care practice could lead to improvements in resident quality of life, staff knowledge and understanding and care practices. The findings suggest that routinely measuring quality of life as a part of normal care could also have more far-reaching effects on the provision of person-centred care provided by care staff.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e6500-e6510
JournalHealth and Social Care in the Community
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2022

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