Cell- and single molecule-based methods to detect Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor autoantibodies in first episode psychosis patients from the OPTiMiSE project

Julie Jézéquel, Véronique Rogemond, Thomas Pollak, Marilyn Lepleux, Leslie Jacobson, Hélène Gréa, Conrad Iyegbe, Rene Kahn, Philip McGuire, Angela Vincent, Jérôme Honnorat, Marion Leboyer, Laurent Groc

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Abstract

Circulating autoantibodies against glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR-Ab) have been reported in a proportion of patients with psychotic disorders, raising hopes for more appropriate treatment for these antibody-positive patients. However, the prevalence of circulating NMDAR-Ab in psychotic disorders remains controversial with detection prevalence rates, and immunoglobulin (Ig) classes, varying considerably between studies, perhaps because of different detection methods. Here, we compared the results of serum assays for a large cohort of first episode psychosis patients (FEP) using classical cell-based assays in three labs and a single molecule-based imaging method. Most assays and single molecule imaging in live hippocampal neurons revealed the presence of circulating NMDAR-Ab in approximately 5% of FEP patients. However, some heterogeneity between cell-based assays was clearly observed, highlighting the urgent need of new sensitive methods to detect the presence of low-titer NMDAR-Ab in seropositive patients that cannot be clinically identified from seronegative ones.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBiological psychiatry
Early online date6 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Jul 2017

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