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Challenges in delivering personalised support to people with multiple and complex needs: qualitative study

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Challenges in delivering personalised support to people with multiple and complex needs: qualitative study. / Neale, Joanne; Parkman, Tom; Strang, John S.

In: JOURNAL OF INTERPROFESSIONAL CARE, 10.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Neale, J, Parkman, T & Strang, JS 2018, 'Challenges in delivering personalised support to people with multiple and complex needs: qualitative study', JOURNAL OF INTERPROFESSIONAL CARE. https://doi.org/10.1080/13561820.2018.1553869

APA

Neale, J., Parkman, T., & Strang, J. S. (2018). Challenges in delivering personalised support to people with multiple and complex needs: qualitative study. JOURNAL OF INTERPROFESSIONAL CARE. https://doi.org/10.1080/13561820.2018.1553869

Vancouver

Neale J, Parkman T, Strang JS. Challenges in delivering personalised support to people with multiple and complex needs: qualitative study. JOURNAL OF INTERPROFESSIONAL CARE. 2018 Dec 10. https://doi.org/10.1080/13561820.2018.1553869

Author

Neale, Joanne ; Parkman, Tom ; Strang, John S. / Challenges in delivering personalised support to people with multiple and complex needs: qualitative study. In: JOURNAL OF INTERPROFESSIONAL CARE. 2018.

Bibtex Download

@article{4a90b9731e6d47b298223459a7561fe6,
title = "Challenges in delivering personalised support to people with multiple and complex needs: qualitative study",
abstract = "Personalisation involves placing service users at the centre of service provision to ensure that the support they receive meets their individual needs, hopes and goals. This paper focuses on a programme delivering personalised support to people with multiple and complex needs (‘beneficiaries’). Each beneficiary received a tailored package of support and a £12,000 personal budget. Despite being well-resourced, the programme struggled to recruit and retain beneficiaries. The aim of this paper is to identify the challenges encountered and to share learning. Repeat semi-structured interviews (n = 56) were conducted with beneficiaries, programme workers and external partners. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, coded and analysed via Iterative Categorization. Five categories of challenge were identified: 1. poor understanding of the programme; 2. the characteristics and needs of beneficiaries and programme workers; 3. lack of clarity regarding who owned and controlled the budget; 4. strained interprofessional relationships; and 5. excessive bureaucracy combined with difficulties establishing programme outcomes. Findings illustrate how the delivery of person-centred support is compromised by interacting individual, organisational, and system level factors, particularly poor interprofessional collaboration. The data also suggest that personal budgets may undermine personalisation for people with multiple and complex needs.",
author = "Joanne Neale and Tom Parkman and Strang, {John S}",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1080/13561820.2018.1553869",
language = "English",
journal = "JOURNAL OF INTERPROFESSIONAL CARE",
issn = "1356-1820",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Challenges in delivering personalised support to people with multiple and complex needs: qualitative study

AU - Neale, Joanne

AU - Parkman, Tom

AU - Strang, John S

PY - 2018/12/10

Y1 - 2018/12/10

N2 - Personalisation involves placing service users at the centre of service provision to ensure that the support they receive meets their individual needs, hopes and goals. This paper focuses on a programme delivering personalised support to people with multiple and complex needs (‘beneficiaries’). Each beneficiary received a tailored package of support and a £12,000 personal budget. Despite being well-resourced, the programme struggled to recruit and retain beneficiaries. The aim of this paper is to identify the challenges encountered and to share learning. Repeat semi-structured interviews (n = 56) were conducted with beneficiaries, programme workers and external partners. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, coded and analysed via Iterative Categorization. Five categories of challenge were identified: 1. poor understanding of the programme; 2. the characteristics and needs of beneficiaries and programme workers; 3. lack of clarity regarding who owned and controlled the budget; 4. strained interprofessional relationships; and 5. excessive bureaucracy combined with difficulties establishing programme outcomes. Findings illustrate how the delivery of person-centred support is compromised by interacting individual, organisational, and system level factors, particularly poor interprofessional collaboration. The data also suggest that personal budgets may undermine personalisation for people with multiple and complex needs.

AB - Personalisation involves placing service users at the centre of service provision to ensure that the support they receive meets their individual needs, hopes and goals. This paper focuses on a programme delivering personalised support to people with multiple and complex needs (‘beneficiaries’). Each beneficiary received a tailored package of support and a £12,000 personal budget. Despite being well-resourced, the programme struggled to recruit and retain beneficiaries. The aim of this paper is to identify the challenges encountered and to share learning. Repeat semi-structured interviews (n = 56) were conducted with beneficiaries, programme workers and external partners. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, coded and analysed via Iterative Categorization. Five categories of challenge were identified: 1. poor understanding of the programme; 2. the characteristics and needs of beneficiaries and programme workers; 3. lack of clarity regarding who owned and controlled the budget; 4. strained interprofessional relationships; and 5. excessive bureaucracy combined with difficulties establishing programme outcomes. Findings illustrate how the delivery of person-centred support is compromised by interacting individual, organisational, and system level factors, particularly poor interprofessional collaboration. The data also suggest that personal budgets may undermine personalisation for people with multiple and complex needs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85058208714&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/13561820.2018.1553869

DO - 10.1080/13561820.2018.1553869

M3 - Article

JO - JOURNAL OF INTERPROFESSIONAL CARE

JF - JOURNAL OF INTERPROFESSIONAL CARE

SN - 1356-1820

ER -

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