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Climate shaped how Neolithic farmers and European hunter-gatherers interacted after a major slowdown from 6,100 BCE to 4,500 BCE

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Climate shaped how Neolithic farmers and European hunter-gatherers interacted after a major slowdown from 6,100 BCE to 4,500 BCE. / Betti, L; Beyer, R; Jones, Eppie R; Eriksson, Jon Anders; Tassi, F; Siska, V; Leonardi, M; Pierpaolo, MD; Bentley, LK; Nigst, PR; Stock, J; Pinhasi, R; Manica, A.

In: Nature Human Behaviour, 11.02.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Betti, L, Beyer, R, Jones, ER, Eriksson, JA, Tassi, F, Siska, V, Leonardi, M, Pierpaolo, MD, Bentley, LK, Nigst, PR, Stock, J, Pinhasi, R & Manica, A 2020, 'Climate shaped how Neolithic farmers and European hunter-gatherers interacted after a major slowdown from 6,100 BCE to 4,500 BCE', Nature Human Behaviour.

APA

Betti, L., Beyer, R., Jones, E. R., Eriksson, J. A., Tassi, F., Siska, V., Leonardi, M., Pierpaolo, MD., Bentley, LK., Nigst, PR., Stock, J., Pinhasi, R., & Manica, A. (Accepted/In press). Climate shaped how Neolithic farmers and European hunter-gatherers interacted after a major slowdown from 6,100 BCE to 4,500 BCE. Nature Human Behaviour.

Vancouver

Betti L, Beyer R, Jones ER, Eriksson JA, Tassi F, Siska V et al. Climate shaped how Neolithic farmers and European hunter-gatherers interacted after a major slowdown from 6,100 BCE to 4,500 BCE. Nature Human Behaviour. 2020 Feb 11.

Author

Betti, L ; Beyer, R ; Jones, Eppie R ; Eriksson, Jon Anders ; Tassi, F ; Siska, V ; Leonardi, M ; Pierpaolo, MD ; Bentley, LK ; Nigst, PR ; Stock, J ; Pinhasi, R ; Manica, A. / Climate shaped how Neolithic farmers and European hunter-gatherers interacted after a major slowdown from 6,100 BCE to 4,500 BCE. In: Nature Human Behaviour. 2020.

Bibtex Download

@article{32e959d767564f4a9d6e0b3b9dd606df,
title = "Climate shaped how Neolithic farmers and European hunter-gatherers interacted after a major slowdown from 6,100 BCE to 4,500 BCE",
abstract = "The Neolithic transition in Europe was driven by the rapid dispersal of Near Eastern farmers who, over a period of 3,500 years, brought food production to the furthest corners of the continent. This wave of expansion, however, was far from homogeneous, and climatic factors may have driven a marked slowdown observed at higher latitudes. Here we test this hypothesis by assembling a large database of archaeological dates of first arrival of farming to quantify the expansion dynamics. We identify four axes of expansion and observe a slowdown along three axes when crossing the same climatic threshold. This threshold reflects the quality of the growing season, suggesting that Near Eastern crops might have struggled in more challenging climatic conditions. This same threshold also predicts the mixing of farmers and hunter-gatherers as estimated from ancient DNA, suggesting that unreliable yields in these regions might have favoured the contact between the two groups.",
author = "L Betti and R Beyer and Jones, {Eppie R} and Eriksson, {Jon Anders} and F Tassi and V Siska and M Leonardi and MD Pierpaolo and LK Bentley and PR Nigst and J Stock and R Pinhasi and A Manica",
year = "2020",
month = feb,
day = "11",
language = "English",
journal = "Nature Human Behaviour",
issn = "2397-3374",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Climate shaped how Neolithic farmers and European hunter-gatherers interacted after a major slowdown from 6,100 BCE to 4,500 BCE

AU - Betti, L

AU - Beyer, R

AU - Jones, Eppie R

AU - Eriksson, Jon Anders

AU - Tassi, F

AU - Siska, V

AU - Leonardi, M

AU - Pierpaolo, MD

AU - Bentley, LK

AU - Nigst, PR

AU - Stock, J

AU - Pinhasi, R

AU - Manica, A

PY - 2020/2/11

Y1 - 2020/2/11

N2 - The Neolithic transition in Europe was driven by the rapid dispersal of Near Eastern farmers who, over a period of 3,500 years, brought food production to the furthest corners of the continent. This wave of expansion, however, was far from homogeneous, and climatic factors may have driven a marked slowdown observed at higher latitudes. Here we test this hypothesis by assembling a large database of archaeological dates of first arrival of farming to quantify the expansion dynamics. We identify four axes of expansion and observe a slowdown along three axes when crossing the same climatic threshold. This threshold reflects the quality of the growing season, suggesting that Near Eastern crops might have struggled in more challenging climatic conditions. This same threshold also predicts the mixing of farmers and hunter-gatherers as estimated from ancient DNA, suggesting that unreliable yields in these regions might have favoured the contact between the two groups.

AB - The Neolithic transition in Europe was driven by the rapid dispersal of Near Eastern farmers who, over a period of 3,500 years, brought food production to the furthest corners of the continent. This wave of expansion, however, was far from homogeneous, and climatic factors may have driven a marked slowdown observed at higher latitudes. Here we test this hypothesis by assembling a large database of archaeological dates of first arrival of farming to quantify the expansion dynamics. We identify four axes of expansion and observe a slowdown along three axes when crossing the same climatic threshold. This threshold reflects the quality of the growing season, suggesting that Near Eastern crops might have struggled in more challenging climatic conditions. This same threshold also predicts the mixing of farmers and hunter-gatherers as estimated from ancient DNA, suggesting that unreliable yields in these regions might have favoured the contact between the two groups.

M3 - Article

JO - Nature Human Behaviour

JF - Nature Human Behaviour

SN - 2397-3374

ER -

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