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Congenital diaphragmatic hernia-influence of fetoscopic tracheal occlusion on outcomes and predictors of survival

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kamal Ali, Perraju Bendapudi, Satyamaanasa Polubothu, Gwendolyn Andradi, Mercy Ofuya, Janet Peacock, Ann Hickey, Mark Davenport, Kypros Nicolaides, Anne Greenough

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Pediatrics
Early online date8 Jun 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 8 Jun 2016

King's Authors

Abstract

The morbidity of infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) who had undergone foetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion (FETO) to those who had not was compared and predictors of survival regardless of antenatal intervention were identified. FETO was undertaken on the basis of the lung to head ratio or the position of the liver. A retrospective review of the records of 78 CDH infants was undertaken to determine the lung-head ratio (LHR) at referral and prior to birth, maximum oxygen saturation in the labour suite and neonatal outcomes. The 43 FETO infants were born earlier (mean 34 versus 38 weeks) (p < 0.001). They had a lower mean LHR at referral (0.65 versus 1.24) (p < 0.001) but not prior to birth and did not have a higher mortality than the 35 non-FETO infants. The FETO infants required significantly longer durations of ventilation (median: 15 versus 6 days) and supplementary oxygen (28 versus 8 days) and hospital stay (29 versus 16 days). Overall, the best predictor of survival was the OI in the first 24 h.

CONCLUSION: The FETO group had increased morbidity, but not mortality. The lowest oxygenation index in the first 24 h was the best predictor of survival regardless of antenatal intervention.

WHAT IS KNOWN: • Randomised controlled trials have demonstrated that foetal endotracheal occlusion (FETO) in high risk infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia is associated with a higher survival rate. • Mortality is greater in foetuses who underwent FETO and delivered prior to 35 weeks of gestation. What is New: • Infants who had undergone FETO compared to those who had not had significantly longer durations of mechanical ventilation, supplementary oxygen and hospital stay. • Regardless of antenatal intervention, the lowest oxygenation index in the first 24 h was the best predictor of survival.

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