Conserved non-coding elements and cis regulation: actions speak louder than words

Andrew C. Nelson*, Fiona C. Wardle

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature reviewpeer-review

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is a truth (almost) universally acknowledged that conserved non-coding genomic sequences function in the cis regulation of neighbouring genes. But is this a misconception? The literature is strewn with examples of conserved non-coding sequences being able to drive reporter expression, but the extent to which such sequences are actually used endogenously in vivo is only now being rigorously explored using unbiased genome-scale approaches. Here, we review the emerging picture, examining the extent to which conserved non-coding sequences equivalently regulate gene expression in different species, or at different developmental stages, and how genomics approaches are revealing the relationship between sequence conservation and functional use of cis-regulatory elements.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1385-1395
Number of pages11
JournalDevelopment
Volume140
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2013

Keywords

  • ChIP
  • Conserved non-coding elements
  • Cis regulation
  • Enhancer assay
  • Phylotypic stage
  • TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR-BINDING
  • KEY DEVELOPMENTAL GENES
  • EMBRYONIC STEM-CELLS
  • HUMAN GENOME
  • IN-VIVO
  • ULTRACONSERVED ELEMENTS
  • EVOLUTIONARY DYNAMICS
  • CHROMATIN SIGNATURES
  • TEMPORAL MAP
  • ENHANCERS

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Conserved non-coding elements and cis regulation: actions speak louder than words'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this