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Context Affects Quiet Eye Duration and Motor Performance Independent of Cognitive Effort

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Oliver R Runswick, Matthew Jewiss, Ben T Sharpe, Jamie S North

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-197
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Sport & Exercise Psychology
Volume43
Issue number2
Early online date17 Mar 2021
DOIs
E-pub ahead of print17 Mar 2021
Published17 Mar 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Human Kinetics, Inc. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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Abstract

Extensive literature has shown the effect of "quiet eye" (QE) on motor performance. However, little attention has been paid to the context in which tasks are executed (independent of anxiety) and the mechanisms that underpin the phenomenon. Here, the authors aimed to investigate the effects of context (independent of anxiety) on QE and performance while examining if the mechanisms underpinning QE are rooted in cognitive effort. In this study, 21 novice participants completed golf putts while pupil dilation, QE duration, and putting accuracy were measured. Results showed that putting to win was more accurate compared with the control (no context) condition, and QE duration was longer when putting to win or tie a hole compared with control. There was no effect of context on pupil dilation. Results suggest that, while the task was challenging, performance scenarios can enhance representativeness of practice without adding additional load to cognitive resources, even for novice performers.

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