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Contingency management for tobacco smoking during opioid addiction treatment: a randomised pilot study

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Contingency management for tobacco smoking during opioid addiction treatment : a randomised pilot study. / Ainscough, Tom Stephen; Brose, Leonie S.; Strang, John; McNeill, Ann.

In: BMJ open, Vol. 7, No. 9, 01.09.2017, p. e017467.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Ainscough, TS, Brose, LS, Strang, J & McNeill, A 2017, 'Contingency management for tobacco smoking during opioid addiction treatment: a randomised pilot study', BMJ open, vol. 7, no. 9, pp. e017467. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017467

APA

Ainscough, T. S., Brose, L. S., Strang, J., & McNeill, A. (2017). Contingency management for tobacco smoking during opioid addiction treatment: a randomised pilot study. BMJ open, 7(9), e017467. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017467

Vancouver

Ainscough TS, Brose LS, Strang J, McNeill A. Contingency management for tobacco smoking during opioid addiction treatment: a randomised pilot study. BMJ open. 2017 Sep 1;7(9):e017467. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017467

Author

Ainscough, Tom Stephen ; Brose, Leonie S. ; Strang, John ; McNeill, Ann. / Contingency management for tobacco smoking during opioid addiction treatment : a randomised pilot study. In: BMJ open. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 9. pp. e017467.

Bibtex Download

@article{d26e2ed578114967894f176226995756,
title = "Contingency management for tobacco smoking during opioid addiction treatment: a randomised pilot study",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Smoking rates among individuals in treatment for opioid addiction are close to five times that of the general public. Moreover, drug-addicted smokers have a premature mortality rate four times greater than drug-addicted non-smokers. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether contingency management (CM) can be successfully added to evidence-based stop smoking treatment in individuals undergoing treatment for opioid addiction and assess preliminary evidence for its impact.PARTICIPANTS: Forty tobacco smokers currently undergoing treatment for opioid addiction.INTERVENTION: Escalating with reset CM as an adjunct to standard smoking cessation treatment. Financial incentives will be administered over a 5-week period for either biochemically verified abstinence from smoking or attendance at the clinic. Participants will be randomised to conditions stratified on current levels of smoking (high or low).OBJECTIVES AND ANALYSES: To assess whether a CM intervention can be successfully added to standard stop smoking services treatment, in patients undergoing outpatient treatment for opioid addiction. This will be measured as the number of people completing the 5 weeks of the intervention.ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval for the study was granted on the 16 June 2016 by the London-city and east (reference 16/LO/0990) ethics committee. The pilot study was retrospectively registered on clincaltrials.gov in January 2017 (ID: NCT03015597). A SPIRIT checklist and figure are available for this protocol. It is planned that the results of this study will be published in an academic journal.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Ainscough, {Tom Stephen} and Brose, {Leonie S.} and John Strang and Ann McNeill",
note = "{\textcopyright} Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.",
year = "2017",
month = sep,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017467",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "e017467",
journal = "BMJ Open",
issn = "2044-6055",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "9",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Contingency management for tobacco smoking during opioid addiction treatment

T2 - a randomised pilot study

AU - Ainscough, Tom Stephen

AU - Brose, Leonie S.

AU - Strang, John

AU - McNeill, Ann

N1 - © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - INTRODUCTION: Smoking rates among individuals in treatment for opioid addiction are close to five times that of the general public. Moreover, drug-addicted smokers have a premature mortality rate four times greater than drug-addicted non-smokers. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether contingency management (CM) can be successfully added to evidence-based stop smoking treatment in individuals undergoing treatment for opioid addiction and assess preliminary evidence for its impact.PARTICIPANTS: Forty tobacco smokers currently undergoing treatment for opioid addiction.INTERVENTION: Escalating with reset CM as an adjunct to standard smoking cessation treatment. Financial incentives will be administered over a 5-week period for either biochemically verified abstinence from smoking or attendance at the clinic. Participants will be randomised to conditions stratified on current levels of smoking (high or low).OBJECTIVES AND ANALYSES: To assess whether a CM intervention can be successfully added to standard stop smoking services treatment, in patients undergoing outpatient treatment for opioid addiction. This will be measured as the number of people completing the 5 weeks of the intervention.ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval for the study was granted on the 16 June 2016 by the London-city and east (reference 16/LO/0990) ethics committee. The pilot study was retrospectively registered on clincaltrials.gov in January 2017 (ID: NCT03015597). A SPIRIT checklist and figure are available for this protocol. It is planned that the results of this study will be published in an academic journal.

AB - INTRODUCTION: Smoking rates among individuals in treatment for opioid addiction are close to five times that of the general public. Moreover, drug-addicted smokers have a premature mortality rate four times greater than drug-addicted non-smokers. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether contingency management (CM) can be successfully added to evidence-based stop smoking treatment in individuals undergoing treatment for opioid addiction and assess preliminary evidence for its impact.PARTICIPANTS: Forty tobacco smokers currently undergoing treatment for opioid addiction.INTERVENTION: Escalating with reset CM as an adjunct to standard smoking cessation treatment. Financial incentives will be administered over a 5-week period for either biochemically verified abstinence from smoking or attendance at the clinic. Participants will be randomised to conditions stratified on current levels of smoking (high or low).OBJECTIVES AND ANALYSES: To assess whether a CM intervention can be successfully added to standard stop smoking services treatment, in patients undergoing outpatient treatment for opioid addiction. This will be measured as the number of people completing the 5 weeks of the intervention.ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval for the study was granted on the 16 June 2016 by the London-city and east (reference 16/LO/0990) ethics committee. The pilot study was retrospectively registered on clincaltrials.gov in January 2017 (ID: NCT03015597). A SPIRIT checklist and figure are available for this protocol. It is planned that the results of this study will be published in an academic journal.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017467

DO - 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017467

M3 - Article

C2 - 28864706

VL - 7

SP - e017467

JO - BMJ Open

JF - BMJ Open

SN - 2044-6055

IS - 9

ER -

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