Correlation of tumour subtype with long-term outcome in small breast carcinomas: a Swedish population-based retrospective cohort study

Gunilla Rask*, Anoosheh Nazemroaya, Malin Jansson, Charlotta Wadsten, Greger Nilsson, Carl Blomqvist, Lars Holmberg, Fredrik Wärnberg, Malin Sund

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate if molecular subtype is associated with outcome in stage 1 breast cancer (BC). Methods: Tissue samples from 445 women with node-negative BC ≤ 15 mm, treated in 1986–2004, were classified into surrogate molecular subtypes [Luminal A-like, Luminal B-like (HER2−), HER2-positive, and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC)]. Information on treatment, recurrences, and survival were gathered from medical records. Results: Tumour subtype was not associated with overall survival (OS). Luminal B-like (HER2−) and TNBC were associated with higher incidence of distant metastasis at 20 years (Hazard ratio (HR) 2.26; 95% CI 1.08–4.75 and HR 3.24; 95% CI 1.17–9.00, respectively). Luminal B-like (HER2−) and TNBC patients also had worse breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS), although not statistically significant (HR 1.53; 95% CI 0.70–3.33 and HR 1.89; 95% CI 0.60–5.93, respectively). HER2-positive BC was not associated with poor outcome despite no patient receiving HER2-targeted therapy, with most of these tumours being ER+. Conclusions: Stage 1 TNBC or Luminal B-like (HER2−) tumours behave more aggressively. Women with HER2+/ER+ tumours do not have an increased risk of distant metastasis or death, absent targeted treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)367-377
Number of pages11
JournalBreast Cancer Research and Treatment
Volume195
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2022

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Long-term outcome
  • Molecular subtypes
  • TMA

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