Cortical changes in chronic low back pain: Current state of the art and implications for clinical practice

Benedict Martin Wand, Luke Parkitny, Neil Edward O'Connell, Hannu Luomajoki, James Henry McAuley, Michael Thacker, G. Lorimer Moseley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

244 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that chronic pain problems are characterised by alterations in brain structure and function. Chronic back pain is no exception. There is a growing sentiment, with accompanying theory, that these brain changes contribute to chronic back pain, although empirical support is lacking. This paper reviews the structural and functional changes of the brain that have been observed in people with chronic back pain. We cast light on the clinical implications of these changes and the possibilities for new treatments but we also advise caution against concluding their efficacy in the absence of solid evidence to this effect. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15 - 20
Number of pages6
JournalManual Therapy
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cortical changes in chronic low back pain: Current state of the art and implications for clinical practice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this