Cortical thickness and surface area as an endophenotype in bipolar disorder type I patients and their first-degree relatives

Nefize Yalin, Aybala Saricicek, Ceren Hidiroglu, Andre Zugman, Nese Direk, Berrin Cavusoglu, Emel Ada, Ayse Er, Gizem Isik, Deniz Ceylan, Zeliha Tunca, Matthew Kempton, Aysegul Ozerdem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Objectives
So far, few studies have investigated cortical thickness (CT) and surface area (SA) measures in bipolar disorder type I (BDI) in comparison to a high genetic risk group such as first-degree relatives (FR). This study aimed to examine CT and SA differences between BDI, FR and healthy controls (HC).

Methods
3D T1 magnetic resonance images were acquired from 27 euthymic BDI patients 24 unaffected FR and 29 HC. CT and SA measures were obtained with FreeSurfer version 5.3.0. Generalized estimating equations were used to compare CT and SA between groups. Group comparisons were repeated with restricting the FR group to 17 siblings (FR-SB) only.

Results
\Mean age in years was 36.3 ± 9.5 for BDI, 32.1 ± 10.9 for FR, 34.7 ± 9.8 for FR-SB and 33.1 ± 9.0 for HC group respectively. BDI patients revealed larger SA of left pars triangularis (LPT) compared to HC (p = .001). In addition, increased SA in superior temporal cortex (STC) in FR-SB group compared to HC was identified (p = .0001).

Conclusions
Our result of increased SA in LPT of BDI could be a disease marker and increased SA in STC of FR-SB could be a marker related with resilience to illness.
Original languageEnglish
Article number101695
Pages (from-to)101695
JournalNeuroImage. Clinical
Volume22
Early online date29 Jan 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 29 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Bipolar disorder type I
  • Cortical thickness
  • Endophenotype
  • First-degree relative
  • Surface area

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