Cost-Effectiveness of Erenumab for the Preventive Treatment of Migraine in Patients with Prior Treatment Failures in Sweden

Ronan Mahon*, Andrea Lang, Pamela Vo, Jasper Huels, Philip Cooney, Andriy Danyliv, Umakanth Vudumula, Sreelatha Vadapalle, Farooq Maniyar, Peter J. Goadsby

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Migraine is a common neurological disease that disproportionately affects females and has a peak incidence during productive years, resulting in significant burden. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the cost effectiveness of erenumab for the preventive treatment of migraine. Methods: A hybrid decision-tree plus Markov model was developed to evaluate the cost effectiveness of erenumab as a migraine treatment compared with best supportive care only for patients experiencing at least 4 monthly migraine days for whom at least two prior preventive treatments had failed. Clinical efficacy data were based on results from four randomized controlled trials of erenumab against placebo. The primary outcomes were costs, migraine days, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). An incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated as the cost per QALY gained. The cost per migraine day avoided was also estimated, as were disaggregated direct and indirect costs. The analysis was conducted from Swedish societal and healthcare system perspectives based on total migraine, chronic migraine and episodic migraine populations, using a discount rate of 3% applied to both costs and health benefits and using year 2019 values. Results: In the base-case deterministic analyses, erenumab treatment resulted in ICERs of Swedish krona (SEK) 34,696 (€3310) and SEK301,565 (€28,769) per QALY gained in the total migraine and episodic migraine populations, respectively. Erenumab was dominant in the chronic migraine population. In the total migraine population, the use of erenumab resulted in a net benefit to society of SEK81,739 (€7773) per patient, assuming a willingness-to-pay threshold of SEK300,000 (€28,528) per QALY. Conclusions: Our analysis suggests that erenumab is a cost-effective treatment for migraine with a willingness-to-pay threshold of SEK300,000 per QALY.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)357-372
Number of pages16
JournalPharmacoEconomics
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2021

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