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Cost-effectiveness of donepezil and memantine in moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease (the DOMINO-AD trial)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martin Knapp, Derek King, Renée Romeo, Jessica Adams, Ashley Baldwin, Clive Ballard, Sube Banerjee, Robert Barber, Peter Bentham, Richard G Brown, Alistair Burns, Tom Dening, David Findlay, Clive Holmes, Tony Johnson, Robert Jones, Cornelius Katona, James Lindesay, Ajay Macharouthu, Ian McKeith & 5 more Rupert McShane, John T O'Brien, Patrick P J Phillips, Bart Sheehan, Robert Howard

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Early online date13 Oct 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 Oct 2016

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King's Authors

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Most investigations of pharmacotherapy for treating Alzheimer's disease focus on patients with mild-to-moderate symptoms, with little evidence to guide clinical decisions when symptoms become severe. We examined whether continuing donepezil, or commencing memantine, is cost-effective for community-dwelling, moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease patients.

METHODS: Cost-effectiveness analysis was based on a 52-week, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, factorial clinical trial. A total of 295 community-dwelling patients with moderate/severe Alzheimer's disease, already treated with donepezil, were randomised to: (i) continue donepezil; (ii) discontinue donepezil; (iii) discontinue donepezil and start memantine; or (iv) continue donepezil and start memantine.

RESULTS: Continuing donepezil for 52 weeks was more cost-effective than discontinuation, considering cognition, activities of daily living and health-related quality of life. Starting memantine was more cost-effective than donepezil discontinuation. Donepezil-memantine combined is not more cost-effective than donepezil alone.

CONCLUSIONS: Robust evidence is now available to inform clinical decisions and commissioning strategies so as to improve patients' lives whilst making efficient use of available resources. Clinical guidelines for treating moderate/severe Alzheimer's disease, such as those issued by NICE in England and Wales, should be revisited. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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