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Crime, insecurity, and corruption: Considering the growth of urban private security

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Crime, insecurity, and corruption : Considering the growth of urban private security. / Garmany, Jeffrey Todd; Galdeano, Ana Paula.

In: URBAN STUDIES, Vol. 55, No. 5, 01.04.2018, p. 1111-1120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Garmany, JT & Galdeano, AP 2018, 'Crime, insecurity, and corruption: Considering the growth of urban private security', URBAN STUDIES, vol. 55, no. 5, pp. 1111-1120. https://doi.org/10.1177/0042098017732691

APA

Garmany, J. T., & Galdeano, A. P. (2018). Crime, insecurity, and corruption: Considering the growth of urban private security. URBAN STUDIES, 55(5), 1111-1120. https://doi.org/10.1177/0042098017732691

Vancouver

Garmany JT, Galdeano AP. Crime, insecurity, and corruption: Considering the growth of urban private security. URBAN STUDIES. 2018 Apr 1;55(5):1111-1120. https://doi.org/10.1177/0042098017732691

Author

Garmany, Jeffrey Todd ; Galdeano, Ana Paula. / Crime, insecurity, and corruption : Considering the growth of urban private security. In: URBAN STUDIES. 2018 ; Vol. 55, No. 5. pp. 1111-1120.

Bibtex Download

@article{6e20a4b2e6b5429f88b1768202fe977e,
title = "Crime, insecurity, and corruption: Considering the growth of urban private security",
abstract = "In this article we call into question the growing presence of private securitycompanies (PSCs) in cities throughout the world. Though PSCs have grownenormously in recent decades, there exist few academic analyses to consider theirbroad reaching effects. Researchers still have much to understand about therelationships between PSCs and changing patterns of urban development,governance, and public security. PSCs are prevalent in both the Global North andSouth, yet their presence is perhaps most intense in emerging countries, wheresocial inequality is high and public security is tenuous. As such, in this article wedraw on specific examples from the city of S{\~a}o Paulo, Brazil, where demand issoaring for private security and PSCs operate in complicated networks between thestate, private capital, and organized crime. Our analysis draws attention to theparadoxes of urban private security, beginning with the fact that public insecurity isin fact good for PSC business. By reflecting on existing published resources – andmaking connections across several disciplines – our goals in this article are threefold:1) to highlight the need for more research on PSCs in urban settings; 2) to drawattention to the ways private security is changing urban space, and; 3) to suggestthat the growth of PSCs, rather than being representative of increased publicsecurity, may in some cases coincide with rising levels of urban crime and insecurity.",
author = "Garmany, {Jeffrey Todd} and Galdeano, {Ana Paula}",
year = "2018",
month = apr,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0042098017732691",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "1111--1120",
journal = "URBAN STUDIES",
issn = "0042-0980",
publisher = "Sage Publications",
number = "5",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Crime, insecurity, and corruption

T2 - Considering the growth of urban private security

AU - Garmany, Jeffrey Todd

AU - Galdeano, Ana Paula

PY - 2018/4/1

Y1 - 2018/4/1

N2 - In this article we call into question the growing presence of private securitycompanies (PSCs) in cities throughout the world. Though PSCs have grownenormously in recent decades, there exist few academic analyses to consider theirbroad reaching effects. Researchers still have much to understand about therelationships between PSCs and changing patterns of urban development,governance, and public security. PSCs are prevalent in both the Global North andSouth, yet their presence is perhaps most intense in emerging countries, wheresocial inequality is high and public security is tenuous. As such, in this article wedraw on specific examples from the city of São Paulo, Brazil, where demand issoaring for private security and PSCs operate in complicated networks between thestate, private capital, and organized crime. Our analysis draws attention to theparadoxes of urban private security, beginning with the fact that public insecurity isin fact good for PSC business. By reflecting on existing published resources – andmaking connections across several disciplines – our goals in this article are threefold:1) to highlight the need for more research on PSCs in urban settings; 2) to drawattention to the ways private security is changing urban space, and; 3) to suggestthat the growth of PSCs, rather than being representative of increased publicsecurity, may in some cases coincide with rising levels of urban crime and insecurity.

AB - In this article we call into question the growing presence of private securitycompanies (PSCs) in cities throughout the world. Though PSCs have grownenormously in recent decades, there exist few academic analyses to consider theirbroad reaching effects. Researchers still have much to understand about therelationships between PSCs and changing patterns of urban development,governance, and public security. PSCs are prevalent in both the Global North andSouth, yet their presence is perhaps most intense in emerging countries, wheresocial inequality is high and public security is tenuous. As such, in this article wedraw on specific examples from the city of São Paulo, Brazil, where demand issoaring for private security and PSCs operate in complicated networks between thestate, private capital, and organized crime. Our analysis draws attention to theparadoxes of urban private security, beginning with the fact that public insecurity isin fact good for PSC business. By reflecting on existing published resources – andmaking connections across several disciplines – our goals in this article are threefold:1) to highlight the need for more research on PSCs in urban settings; 2) to drawattention to the ways private security is changing urban space, and; 3) to suggestthat the growth of PSCs, rather than being representative of increased publicsecurity, may in some cases coincide with rising levels of urban crime and insecurity.

U2 - 10.1177/0042098017732691

DO - 10.1177/0042098017732691

M3 - Article

VL - 55

SP - 1111

EP - 1120

JO - URBAN STUDIES

JF - URBAN STUDIES

SN - 0042-0980

IS - 5

ER -

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